David Hepworth on Trump. “He has no principles. Therefore he has nothing to hide.”

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I know that the 45th President is a very easy target but that shouldn’t diminish this elegant, excellent piece by David Hepworth.

Full piece here

It concludes:

This is not a man that anybody looks at and thinks, “he represents my values or my country”.

Nobody would lend him their lawnmower.

He’s a television personality. To twist an old Tom Stoppard line, he’s the opposite of a person.

What he’s doing at the moment is “Larping”. Live Action Role Playing.

He has no principles. Therefore he has nothing to hide.

TV has a lot of answer for. This is the person the TV industry has been building towards since the middle 1950s. Nothing on the surface and nothing underneath either.

 

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The Monday Morning Quote #404

“Increasingly, we become so secure in our bubbles that we accept only information, whether true or not, that fits our opinions, instead of basing our opinions on the evidence that’s out there.”

Barack Obama in his farewell speech, Chicago, 10 January 2017.

(via John Naughton)

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The Weekend Read – What they don’t teach you at Harvard Business School by Mark H McCormack

9781781253397First published in 1984, I see that it is still one of the top sellers in the Business sections of airport book shops. Its very longevity proves that it either must have something going for it or because it has always been popular it must be good. Well you pays your money and you takes your choice. I find it a well written, easily digestible book with plenty to offer anyone in any business.

I read it when it was first released by Collins in 1984 (so yet another thank you to my Dad)  thinking that the lessons of “big business” which at the time were a million miles away from my life as a peripatetic associate in dental practices would not apply to my life. In this as in many other things I was wrong – the fundamentals of business large or small are the same. I have re-read it a couple of times since and although the landscape may have changed the fundamentals have not – nor will they.

The book is split into three sections People, Sales & Negotiations, and Running a Business. The opening four chapters should be compulsory reading for all new dental graduates including as they do with getting on with people, making an impression and getting ahead. The Sales and Negotiations isn’t as high blown as you may think and has plenty of nitty gritty advice.

The last four chapters on running a business are invaluable to anyone thinking about getting into business on their own or wanting to be a first class employee. There is a lot of B***S*** spoken these days about being an entrepreneur; those people who say they want to be an entrepreneur, especially in dentistry, would do well to read the last chapter of the book where he states that 99% of people should work for somebody. Start by examining your motives and if they are dreams, if you are running away from things or you ‘want to make a lot of money’ then McCormack writes, “forget it”.

In case you don’t know who Mark McCormack was (he died in 2003) here’s the blurb, “dubbed ‘the most powerful man in sport’, founded IMG (International Management Group) on a handshake. It was the first and is the most successful sports management company in the world, becoming a multi-million dollar, worldwide corporation whose activities in the business and marketing spheres are so diverse as to defy classification. Here, Mark McCormack reveals the secret of his success to key business issues such as analysing yourself and others, sales, negotiation, time management, decision-making and communication. What They Don’t Teach You at Harvard Business School fills the gaps between a business school education and the street knowledge that comes from the day-to-day experience of running a business and managing people. It shares the business skills, techniques and wisdom gleaned from twenty-five years of experience.”

Available from The Book Depository.

30 years on…thanks for the lessons Dad.

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My father retired from work 30 years ago and, had he lived, would have been 95 today.

He left school in 1938 aged 16 and started work for WH Smith & Son leaving them in 1954 to join the publishers and stationers William Collins where he finally became sales director.  

I keep a framed copy of this profile on my workroom wall and re-read it last week for the first time in a decade or more. The two paragraphs below leapt out at me; I had not realised how much his core beliefs, values and experience coincided with mine.

These say a a lot about him and, I would like to think, about me too.

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Thanks for the lessons Dad – even if I didn’t realise what I was learning at the time.

Building A 21st Century Brand

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From the “The Story of Telling”, and as always, well worth a read. Full article here

Forty years ago a brand was an identifier. Branding was what we did to the outside of a product or service after it was conceived and created. Brands became tales woven to increase visibility and memorability using design, clever copy, print and TV…….

….But this isn’t how you build a beloved brand now. Today a brand is a promise that people align with, believe and invest in and branding begins from the inside out. 21st century brands are purpose-driven. They have a reason to exist beyond making a profit, and they no longer aim to appeal to the average or everyone……

….If the nature and function of brands have changed, then the process for developing brands and brand stories must evolve too. We’ll be on our way when we begin by prioritising the objectives on the second list. A brand story is no longer like the top coat of gloss paint applied at the last moment to make the surface shinier and more immediately attractive. It’s the undercoat that often nobody sees, but which allows the brand to endure.

 

 

The Monday Morning Quote #403

Society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they know they shall never sit in.”

— Greek Proverb

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The Weekend Read – The War of Art by Steven Pressfield

9781936891023I have recently read this book for the third time in 12 years. It was a gift from my coach just after I completed the sale of my practice in 2005. Presumably he identified my proclivity for procrastination which has frequently led me away from the right direction, if not always entirely in the wrong one.

The forward by Robert McKee starts, “Steven Pressfield wrote The War of Art for Me. He undoubtedly wrote it for you too, but I know he did it expressly for me because I hold Olympic records for procrastination. I can procrastinate thinking about my procrastination problem. I can procrastinate dealing with my problem of procrastination thinking about my procrastination problem.” All I can say Robert is you’re probably right and it was such a relief to realise that I am not alone.

This is a book in three parts. Book One is about the enemy of creativity which he names Resistance, Book Two is “Turning Pro” and it’s all about Combating Resistance and the author identifies the characteristics, traits and habits that make one “A Pro”.

Finally Book Three is “Beyond Resistance” – The Higher Realm and he considers Inspiration.

I realise that this all sounds well and good, with lofty ideals and ideas, but in reality this book will help, encourage and inspire you to identify the reasons for your lack of accomplishment and with practical ideas get you going again. Time after time after time.

A gem.

Buy it here

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