To Prevent Rheumatoid Arthritis, Look Past the Joints to the Gums. In Case You Missed It- TGBSL#27

An explanation of TGBSL

To Prevent Rheumatoid Arthritis, Look Past the Joints to the Gums

The mouth may seem like a strange place to search for a culprit in a disease that primarily affects the joints. But a recent collaboration by a group of multidisciplinary researchers suggests that one type of oral bacteria may be an important trigger in about half of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) cases. Continues

Some Neanderthals were vegetarians who used natural forms of penicillin and aspirin as medicine

‘Apparently, Neandertals possessed a good knowledge of medicinal plants … the use of antibiotics would be very surprising, as this is more than 40,000 years before we developed penicillin’ Continues & here

Root canal treatments overhauled through new device to detect untreated bacteria

A new method of detecting bacteria during root canal treatments could eradicate the need for follow up appointments and prevent treatments from failing, according to a study published in the Journal of Dental Research. The SafeRoot device, created by a team of researchers at King’s College London, enables rapid bacterial detection inside the root canal, ensuring the procedure has been successful and reducing the need for tooth extraction or surgical intervention. Continues.

Tooth loss linked to an increased risk of dementia

In a study of 1566 community-dwelling Japanese elderly who were followed for 5 years, the risk of developing dementia was elevated in individuals with fewer remaining teeth. Continues

Can oestrogen therapy lead to healthier teeth and gums?

A new study finds links between estrogen therapy and reducing tooth and gum diseases in postmenopausal women. Estrogen therapy is known to help women manage a variety of menopause-related issues: improving bone density and heart health and reducing hot flashes, to name a few. As such, many women choose to take hormones to treat the numerous symptoms associated with menopause. Continues

Review confirms link between drug use and poor dental health

A new review published online in the scientific journal Addiction has found that dental patients with substance use disorders have more tooth decay and periodontal disease than the general population, but are less likely to receive dental care. With drug use increasing by approximately three million new users each year, this is a problem that won’t disappear anytime soon. Continues

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