The Monday Morning Quote #482

“I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”

Maya Angelou

Thanks to my neighbour in Fahoura, Walt, for reminding me of this, (PSyou can find good optometry people in West Cork too).

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So you can be pregnant and sacked….

From the Lexology newsletter.

Can a pregnant employee be fairly dismissed if their employer does not know they are pregnant?

The story starts:

Ms Thompson had been employed just over a month, and was still in her probationary period, when she found out she was pregnant. She experienced pains and was admitted to hospital but did not tell her employer the reason she was admitted to hospital. RECCL therefore thought she should have arranged the hospital appointment in her own time. She also had an altercation with a customer and when picked up on this by RECCL she shot off to the toilet in tears and was sent home.

On 3 August 2016 RECCL decided to dismiss her because of her emotional volatility, performance and because she did not fit in with their work ethic. On 4 August 2016 Ms Thompson told RECCL that she was pregnant. When she returned to work on 5 August 2016 she was given a dismissal letter dated 3 August 2016.

The full story HERE is well worth a read.

Most dental businesses with which I work are terrified of taking any disciplinary procedures with pregnant staff. Yet as long as the proper and appropriate measures are taken and your systems and processes are correct there is no real need to be so. I have emphasised that section in the last sentence because I find, in spite of CQC etc practices that do not fully understand the law, the systems and the processes and therefore run scared of taking appropriate action. Pregnancy regulations are often the tip of the iceberg and in spite of having reams of paperwork, or online documents, from compliance suppliers they haven’t taken the time to read and assimilate the regulations and therefore often make decisions in haste and that is when things go wrong.

Rees’s Reads #1 – Setting The Table by Danny Meyer

Setting The Table – The Transforming Power of Hospitality in Business

This book should be compulsory reading for everyone who works in any business that serves customers face to face. I believe it is essential for any dentist looking to differentiate themselves – especially from corporate practices.

Danny Meyer is a restauranteur. The CEO of Union Square Hospitality Group this books describes how his passion for food and service led to his founding, over a 21 year period, five “white-table” restaurants, an urban barbecue joint, a feel-good jazz club, a neo-roadside hotdog & burger stand, three modern museum cafes and on off-premises, restaurant quality catering company. At the time of writing he had not had to close any of them.

The basis of his an any successful restaurants is the quality of the food allied with a dedication to the best possible service. Danny describes the non-food elements as “hospitality”. His aim when opening a new venue is to, “draw the best elements of the classic, make it authentic for its present context, and then try to execute it with excellence.” 

Throughout the book he presents case studies, words of wisdom, stories of what has worked and what hasn’t, the lessons he has learned and above all how to be successful by serving the public but on your own terms.

Here are a few quotes:

Self: I have always viewed excellence as a journey rather than a destination. Taking that journey demands a form of athleticism. It is the athlete’s nature to call on all resources to compete and win. I believe it’s possible to apply to business the same skills I would apply on a tennis court or baseball diamond. I see this as a combination of innate ability, focused training, and a persistent zeal to win.

Marketing: Know Thyself: Before you go to market, know what you are selling and to whom. It’s a very rare business that can (or should) be all things to all people. Be the best you can be within a reasonably tight product focus. That will help you improve yourself and help your customers to know how and when to buy your product.

Service: Best described through what he has written of how he discovered “enlightened hospitality” after his wife miscarried twins and his life took a different perspective. He describes outlining what he considered non-negotiable about how he does business. “Nothing would ever matter more to me than how we expressed hospitality to each one another. And then in descending order, our next core values would be to extend gracious hospitality to our guests, our community, our suppliers, and finally our investors.”

People: He talks about the 51% that he looks for in employees whether they be chefs or the front of house team. He says he wants people who have 51% emotional hospitality and 49% technical ability. He seeks the “excellence reflex” in people which is a natural reaction to fix something that isn’t right, or to improve something that could be better. “This “excellence reflex” is rooted in instinct and upbringing, and then constantly honed through awareness, caring and practice.”

In the chapter, “Whoever wrote the rule…?” he questions acceptance of the status quo and the conventional ways of doing things saying, “The commitment to add something fresh to an existing dialogue informs every decision my colleagues and I make.”

I could go on but I have exceeded the 500 words I allow myself here. Just get the book, read it and be inspired.

Buy it from The Book Depository HERE.

 

We had shown resilience and proven that so much in performance is about belonging and purpose.

We had shown resilience and proven that so much in performance is about belonging and purpose.

Like I said, it was a surreal weekend; in a city driven by opulence and materialism there were a bunch of boys from the Fijian villages, some who had no family homes to go back to, happier than any of those high-rollers on the Strip.

Ben Ryan on Las Vegas and the Fijian 7s

The Monday Morning Quote #469

“Leadership is the capacity to look ahead, think ahead, plan ahead, and then influence other people to go ahead on the plan”

Ralph C Smedley

CIPD’s Top 6 reasons to go to court

The biggest challenge in Dental Practices through the Spring and Summer of 2017 seemed to be people. I’m not sure if we have greater expectations of our teams and/or our leaders or whether the general feeling of uncertainty (Brexit etc) is manifesting itself in the way we behave towards each other. All I know is I have fielded more questions from clients (& non-clients) about team behaviour than ever before.

CIPD listed their Top 6 Reason employers end up in court and how to avoid it. Full article HERE

1)Discrimination

Why a tricky area of the law is only going to get trickier – and how HR can stay ahead

Among the biggest casualties of the introduction of tribunal fees in 2013 were claims for discrimination – there was a 91 per cent drop in the number of sex discrimination cases in the first year.

The Supreme Court’s decision that fees are unlawful (see page 8) will undoubtedly mean case numbers will rise….

2) TUPE

Service provision changes aren’t exciting, but they could prove costly

It’s the four-letter word every HR professional dreads: TUPE, or the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations, has always been fraught with the potential to confuse because it is highly technical and heavy on detail.

Recent cases have focused on one key aspect of the regulations – whether there has been a service provision change during a transfer, which can then determine which employees retain their current terms and conditions (or not) under TUPE at their new employer….

3) Flexible working

Justifications matter when it comes to granting or denying requests

According to Deloitte’s Millennial Survey 2017, flexible ways of working – whether that’s location, hours or contractual arrangements – are highly valued by workers born between the early 1980s and early 2000s. Those in organisations with a high degree of flexibility are more likely to be loyal to their employer and to say this has a positive impact on their wellbeing and that of the business…

4) Religion

From dress codes to the intricacies of helping people from different faiths work together

When it comes to religion at work, one of the ways it is most visibly expressed is in the way employees dress. Two European cases have provided food for thought on whether employers can be proscriptive with dress codes in relation to religion….

5) Parental leave

Problems over parity between mums and dads could be storing up trouble

With discrimination against women during pregnancy or maternity leave costing businesses close to £280m a year, according to the Equality and Human Rights Commission, parenthood at work is potentially expensive. And discrimination is a particular consideration when it comes to shared parental leave (SPL).

6) Disciplinaries and grievances

Follow the rule book and keep a written record – or be prepared to write a large cheque 

HR isn’t all about the process. But when a disciplinary or grievance makes the news, you can be pretty certain someone, somewhere didn’t follow the rules. Both are situations that organisations strive to resolve informally and internally to avoid a costly tribunal. “Most employees are quite reluctant to raise a formal grievance because they think they will be earmarked as a troublemaker, and employers wish to avoid the fallout,”

The Monday Morning Quote #441

A collection of quotes, aphorisms, sayings, songs or poems to get your week off to a good start.

“There must be a beginning of any great matter, but the continuing unto the end until it be thoroughly finished yields the true glory”

Sir Francis Drake

(whose fleet returned to Plymouth on this day in 1573)

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