The Monday Morning Quote #506

“Doing the right thing is aways difficult. Very few worthwhile things are achieved easily. If you believe that you are doing the right thing, you must find the resilience and staying power to keep trying.”

Ken Jarrold (from Other People’s Shoes)

Hours down. Productivity up. Nothing new.

Sculpture of a Ford car in his father’s village in West Cork.

“Reduce your hours and watch your productivity increase.” I tell my clients that they need to focus on the the three Es by becoming, “Efficient, Effective and Economic.” This does not mean cutting corners or scrimping to save, rather ensuring that you are doing the best you can for only as long as you need – and no longer. Most dentists spend far too much time doing work that is undervalued, under rewarded and ineffective.

When my team & I stopped working 5 clinical days per week, our income and profits rose and team morale increased. Unfortunately there is still a macho thing about being booked “X” weeks ahead, it’s more likely to kill you than make you happy.

My daily calendar tells me that today in 1926 Henry Ford introduced the 5 day, 40 hour working week. I have an interest in Ford, not least because his father was born a few miles from where I am writing this in West Cork and my grandfather had some involvement with the Ford factory in Cork. I wondered how the hours change came about and why we seem to have stuck there or, in some cases, moved backwards in 94 years.

It seemed that Ford’s decision was one of several that put the company’s workers first. In 1914 with a background of unemployment he increased wages from $2.34 to $5 for a nine hour day. This move, doubling the industry norm, shocked many who said it would not succeed. Instead it was “a stroke of brilliance”, it boosted productivity and helped build a sense of company loyalty and pride.

Then came the reduction from 6 to 5 working days, a decision originally made four years earlier, justified by Henry’s son, Edsel Ford, “Every man needs more than one day a week for rest and recreation….The Ford Company always has sought to promote an ideal home life for its employees. We believe that in order to live properly every man should have more time to spend with his family.”

Henry said, “It is high time to rid ourselves of the notion that leisure for workmen is either ‘lost time’ or a class privilege.”

Ford also saw a bigger picture. Give people Saturday off and they can shop and have leisure, thus spending the money they are earning.

…and we think the “gig economy” is progress?

Time to review your associate contract?

A couple of years ago I asked a specialist dental lawyer friend of mine why her firm suggested using the BDA associate contract rather than writing one of their own, she replied that as the BDA contracts are the the mostly widely used they are regarded as the industry standard. She went on to say that the longer and more complicated the contract the more likely it was that there could be challenges and disputes both of which cost money to resolve. (Simplify, simplify)

Times change, bringing changes in the context of contracts, therefore the content needs to evolve.

The BDA has updated their template dental associate contract to reflect these changes; the amendments include clarification around:

  • Practice hours.
  • Time away from the practice.
  • Locum cover.
  • Provision of equipment.
  • Hygienist services.
  • NHS contract requirements.
  • Private fees.
  • Confidentiality and data processing.

I am still surprised by how many associates and principals do not have a formal agreement in place or, where they do, there is no regular formal review of working arrangements. When I visit a practice to carry out a Practice Business Health Check I ask about not only “if” but also “when” contracts are in place and reviewed.

With the self-employed status of associates coming under increasing scrutiny it is important for both parties their contracts are contemporary. 

BDA members can access the relevant updated contracts on the website here: New Contracts

 

The Monday Morning Quote #482

“I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”

Maya Angelou

Thanks to my neighbour in Fahoura, Walt, for reminding me of this, (PSyou can find good optometry people in West Cork too).

So you can be pregnant and sacked….

From the Lexology newsletter.

Can a pregnant employee be fairly dismissed if their employer does not know they are pregnant?

The story starts:

Ms Thompson had been employed just over a month, and was still in her probationary period, when she found out she was pregnant. She experienced pains and was admitted to hospital but did not tell her employer the reason she was admitted to hospital. RECCL therefore thought she should have arranged the hospital appointment in her own time. She also had an altercation with a customer and when picked up on this by RECCL she shot off to the toilet in tears and was sent home.

On 3 August 2016 RECCL decided to dismiss her because of her emotional volatility, performance and because she did not fit in with their work ethic. On 4 August 2016 Ms Thompson told RECCL that she was pregnant. When she returned to work on 5 August 2016 she was given a dismissal letter dated 3 August 2016.

The full story HERE is well worth a read.

Most dental businesses with which I work are terrified of taking any disciplinary procedures with pregnant staff. Yet as long as the proper and appropriate measures are taken and your systems and processes are correct there is no real need to be so. I have emphasised that section in the last sentence because I find, in spite of CQC etc practices that do not fully understand the law, the systems and the processes and therefore run scared of taking appropriate action. Pregnancy regulations are often the tip of the iceberg and in spite of having reams of paperwork, or online documents, from compliance suppliers they haven’t taken the time to read and assimilate the regulations and therefore often make decisions in haste and that is when things go wrong.

Rees’s Reads #1 – Setting The Table by Danny Meyer

Setting The Table – The Transforming Power of Hospitality in Business

This book should be compulsory reading for everyone who works in any business that serves customers face to face. I believe it is essential for any dentist looking to differentiate themselves – especially from corporate practices.

Danny Meyer is a restauranteur. The CEO of Union Square Hospitality Group this books describes how his passion for food and service led to his founding, over a 21 year period, five “white-table” restaurants, an urban barbecue joint, a feel-good jazz club, a neo-roadside hotdog & burger stand, three modern museum cafes and on off-premises, restaurant quality catering company. At the time of writing he had not had to close any of them.

The basis of his an any successful restaurants is the quality of the food allied with a dedication to the best possible service. Danny describes the non-food elements as “hospitality”. His aim when opening a new venue is to, “draw the best elements of the classic, make it authentic for its present context, and then try to execute it with excellence.” 

Throughout the book he presents case studies, words of wisdom, stories of what has worked and what hasn’t, the lessons he has learned and above all how to be successful by serving the public but on your own terms.

Here are a few quotes:

Self: I have always viewed excellence as a journey rather than a destination. Taking that journey demands a form of athleticism. It is the athlete’s nature to call on all resources to compete and win. I believe it’s possible to apply to business the same skills I would apply on a tennis court or baseball diamond. I see this as a combination of innate ability, focused training, and a persistent zeal to win.

Marketing: Know Thyself: Before you go to market, know what you are selling and to whom. It’s a very rare business that can (or should) be all things to all people. Be the best you can be within a reasonably tight product focus. That will help you improve yourself and help your customers to know how and when to buy your product.

Service: Best described through what he has written of how he discovered “enlightened hospitality” after his wife miscarried twins and his life took a different perspective. He describes outlining what he considered non-negotiable about how he does business. “Nothing would ever matter more to me than how we expressed hospitality to each one another. And then in descending order, our next core values would be to extend gracious hospitality to our guests, our community, our suppliers, and finally our investors.”

People: He talks about the 51% that he looks for in employees whether they be chefs or the front of house team. He says he wants people who have 51% emotional hospitality and 49% technical ability. He seeks the “excellence reflex” in people which is a natural reaction to fix something that isn’t right, or to improve something that could be better. “This “excellence reflex” is rooted in instinct and upbringing, and then constantly honed through awareness, caring and practice.”

In the chapter, “Whoever wrote the rule…?” he questions acceptance of the status quo and the conventional ways of doing things saying, “The commitment to add something fresh to an existing dialogue informs every decision my colleagues and I make.”

I could go on but I have exceeded the 500 words I allow myself here. Just get the book, read it and be inspired.

Buy it from The Book Depository HERE.

 

We had shown resilience and proven that so much in performance is about belonging and purpose.

We had shown resilience and proven that so much in performance is about belonging and purpose.

Like I said, it was a surreal weekend; in a city driven by opulence and materialism there were a bunch of boys from the Fijian villages, some who had no family homes to go back to, happier than any of those high-rollers on the Strip.

Ben Ryan on Las Vegas and the Fijian 7s

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