In case you missed..TGBSL #24

TGBSL? see here…

1 Natural tooth repair method, using Alzheimer’s drug, could revolutionise dental treatments.

A new method of stimulating the renewal of living stem cells in tooth pulp using an Alzheimer’s drug has been discovered by a team of researchers at King’s College London.

Following trauma or an infection, the inner, soft pulp of a tooth can become exposed and infected. In order to protect the tooth from infection, a thin band of dentine is naturally produced and this seals the tooth pulp, but it is insufficient to effectively repair large cavities.

Currently dentists use man-made cements or fillings, such as calcium and silicon-based products, to treat these larger cavities and fill holes in teeth. This cement remains in the tooth and fails to disintegrate, meaning that the normal mineral level of the tooth is never completely restored.

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 E-cigarettes ‘just as harmful as tobacco’ for oral health

Electronic cigarettes are often marketed as a safer alternative to conventional cigarettes. When it comes to oral health, however, new research suggests vaping may be just as harmful as smoking.

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3 Sugar Is the New Tobacco, so Let’s Treat It That Way

I was recently asked to speak at the UK parliamentary “Sugar Summit.” This event was convened by Rend Platings, a mother so disturbed by England’s chief medical officer’s revelation that, as a result of obesity, today’s generation of parents may be the first to outlive their children, that she launched a campaign, Sugarwise, to help consumers identify foods with added sugar.

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The Monday Morning Quote #395

“Men do not shape destiny,
Destiny produces the man for the hour”
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I wonder what they would have made of my Social Media profile?

Application for employment

In August 1978 I started my first “proper” job. By proper I mean a job that meant I had satisfied my university examiners and was fit to be registered with the GDC. The interview process was a bit of a cattle market with all the candidates for dental house officer posts at The London Hospital being interviewed and awarded on the same day. My memory is of a full room with all the candidates trying to out-do each other in terms of experience, knowledge and who had the best referees. John “Sam” Holmes and myself had just left Newcastle each with a shiny new BDS which meant we were 6 months behind all the London graduates who qualified in a term over 4 years compared with our 5. We both decided that the two posts for which we had applied, the resident Oral Surgery House Officer jobs, were bound to be given to the more vocal candidates, the ones who had told us how good they were.

We were wrong. They wanted something that we had. I had completed an application form of sorts and submitted a curriculum vitae (cv). The Dean in Newcastle, Professor Roy Storer had given us a lecture and a handout on writing your cv, or resume, and I realised over the next few years of job interviews that other candidates did not possess such a polished document to back up their applications. I was also supported by (good) references from Prof Storer and my Oral Surgery mentor Stewart Blair.

So a document and an interview. I had not been an outstanding student in terms of academia but had enjoyed a very full life at university. I shudder to think what my Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat etc, etc profiles would have looked like. Probably they would have had details of rugby trips, skinny dipping in Leazes Park in the snow and countless parties.

A report in CIPD this week says that, “Third of employers have turned down candidates because of their social media profile”.

Around a third (36 per cent) of the 4,000 HR professionals surveyed said they had declined to interview a candidate, or had rejected an applicant they had already interviewed, after checking their social media posts, while 65 per cent Googled prospective employees.

The process works both ways, however: 28 per cent of jobseekers said their view of an organisation was influenced by what they read about it on websites such as Glassdoor, and they were less likely to apply if they formed an unfavourable impression.

I do wonder what Prof Gordon Seward (my first boss) and the great and the good of London Hospital dentistry sitting around the boardroom table grilling me would have thought of my undergraduate antics. Would they have dismissed me out of hand because of my behaviour on a Dental Students Field Day, not offered me an interview due to the bill for damages when I spoke at the Agric-Dental debate or withdrawn the offer after seeing the photos from my mobile disco Facebook page?

If they did, and I gather from talking to clients that it is, understandably, common practice to Google prospectives, what would they have missed? What could I have missed?

We live in a world that seems to be getting more and more obsessed with safety, where every prospective student and job candidate ticks the correct boxes. Take no risks and you will never accomplish anything.

Beware of throwing the baby out with the bathwater.

The Monday Morning Quote #381

“Everyone has a plan ’till they get punched in the mouth.”

Mike Tyson

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It happened – so here’s an Irish take on “Brexit”.

image-20160619-11135-13fpgkx_2One of the pleasures of living outside the UK and, for the moment anyway, being able to visit freely the country where I pay income tax, is listening to and reading other opinions of the land where I spent my first 60 years. I am no longer a UK citizen, I gave up a dozen years ago as my way of saying to Tony Blair, “not in my name”, when he sent another collection of young men off to die for his vanity.

The phrase “to see ourselves as others see us” was written by a Scot, Robert Burns. These are not my words but I wish they were.

Fintan O’Toole on Brexit: Is England ready for self-government? from the Irish Times via Memex.

Is England ready for self-government? It’s a question that the English used to ask of peoples less obviously made from the right stuff than they are, such as the Indians and the Irish. But it’s time they asked it of themselves.

Brexit is essentially Exit: if the Leave side wins the referendum it will almost certainly be without securing majorities in Scotland or Northern Ireland. For all the talk of reasserting the sovereignty of the United Kingdom, the desire to leave the European Union is driven above all by the rise of English nationalism.

And the chief consequence of Brexit will be the emergence of England as a stand-alone nation. Whatever entity might eventually emerge from a tumultuous breach with the European Union will almost certainly not, in the long term, include Scotland: a second referendum on Scottish independence will be inevitable, and this time Scots would be voting to stay in the EU.

It may or may not include Wales. (A resurgence of Welsh nationalism in reaction to the rise of English nationalism seems possible.)

And its relationship to Northern Ireland will be increasingly tenuous and fraught: if nothing else the Brexit campaign has made it abundantly clear that what happens to the North scarcely merits an English afterthought. The kingdom founded by Boris I will, in time, come to be bounded by the English Channel and the River Tweed.

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The Monday Morning Quote #360

A couple of quotes from Andrew Grove who died last Monday.

“Success breeds complacency.

Complacency breeds failure.

Only the paranoid survive.”


“A corporation is a living organism; it has to continue to shed its skin.

Methods have to change.

Focus has to change.

Values have to change.

The sum total of those changes is transformation.”


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Grove is credited with having transformed Intel from a manufacturer of memory chips into one of the world’s dominant producers of microprocessors. During his tenure as CEO, Grove oversaw a 4,500% increase in Intel’s market capitalization from $4 billion to $197 billion, making it the world’s 7th largest company, with 64,000 employees. Most of the company’s revenues were reinvested in research and development, along with building new facilities, in order to produce improved and faster microprocessors.[14]

 

 

Modern? Yes. Better? I don’t think so.

Red No Button As Symbol For Danger Or Negativity

I had a great day with the dentists from Edinburgh Dental Studio on Monday. This story was told to me by one of principal Graeme Smart’s associates.

She and her partner are looking to buy a house at the moment and had been looking on a particular estate agent’s website at properties in their price range and the locality they sought.

Having found just such a place they rang to book an appointment to view the house only to be told, “we can’t make an appointment for you to view over the phone. We’re a modern estate agent you can only book on-line.”

I do wonder if the client realises what the benefits of using such a “modern estate agent” are to their potential purchasers?

Good luck with the house hunting Phoebe.