Roy Lilley speaks…sense.

I often disagree with Roy Lilley (especially when he discusses dentistry) but his newsletter today makes a few points well, particularly these.

…the only way to achieve that is to de-pompous the GMC and NMC, strip them back to maintaining a register and stop hounding clinicians with all the masonic, legal palaver of hearings…

Clinicians are rarely criminals but they are always human beings and we make mistakes, get confused, get tired, get screwed up by poor systems, bad designs and pressure.

If people think owning up to a mistake could end their career, they’ll hide it and hope.  That is hopeless and serves no purpose.  We have to put a purpose into honesty.  The purpose is to keep us safe and that is all that matters…

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…same sh*t, different profession…

I write mostly about what happens to dentists and the business of dentistry…but let’s not forget that the UK is a pretty lousy place for a lot of professions at the moment, especially the ones that put patient care at their core.

This from the BMJ via reestheskin

“Why do doctors feel the need to do this? A study in The BMJ in 2015 suggested that there is an association between increased defensive practice and a reduced likelihood of being involved in litigation.2 One might conclude that defensive practice is a logical behaviour in the face of a culture that leads to doctors being fearful of the consequences of making an error or even of a known adverse outcome.”

“No doctor sets out to practise defensively, but a system has been created where this is inevitable. The GMC acknowledges that medicine has become more defensive.3 Doctors often lack confidence in the fairness and competence of investigations and continue to see the GMC as threatening.”

An unregulated industry that’s exploiting people, including children,

How ethical is the cosmetic surgery market?

“We’ve got largely an unregulated industry that’s exploiting people, including children, by promoting often untested and unproven products and procedures. We need better regulation of the quality and safety of these procedures, the people who carry them out, and where they are carried out.”

These were strong concluding words from the Nuffield Council of Bioethics. Its recent report, focusing on the ethical issues surrounding the cosmetic surgery industry, makes for very interesting reading. The report highlights the significant concerns, concerns that are shared by many, surrounding the UK cosmetic surgery market.

From Penningtons Manches LLP. Full article HERE.

 

New research discovers way to eliminate needles for dental anaesthetic and other stories. In case you missed it TGBSL #28

New research discovers way to eliminate needles for dental anesthetic

A new study from the University of São Paulo found that there might be no need for needles when administering anesthetic for dental procedures.

Continues HERE

Bioengineered tooth restoration in a large mammal

Researchers at Okayama University report in Scientific Reports successful tooth regeneration in a postnatal large-animal model. The approach used involves the autologous transplantation of bioengineered tooth germ into a canine jawbone; the in vivo artificially created tooth has the structure, composition and physiological characteristics of a natural tooth.

More HERE

New study identifies successful method to reduce dental implant failure

According to the American Academy of Implant Dentistry (AAID), 15 million Americans have crown or bridge replacements and three million have dental implants – with this latter number rising by 500,000 a year. The AAID estimates that the value of the American and European market for dental implants will rise to $4.2 billion by 2022.

Dental implants are a successful form of treatment for patients, yet according to a study published in 2005, five to 10 per cent of all dental implants fail.

Continues HERE

Robotics on the way…

Dr Marc Cooper a dentist turned business consultant, understands all elements of the business of dentistry. Never afraid to be provocative and often way ahead of the curve, his newsletter is amongst my top ten regular must reads.

He has written in recent times about the transformational nature of technology and the growth of robotics and AI with a newsletter, “The End of Dentists as We Know Them” where he quoted from Susskind and Susskind’s HBR paper

Our inclination is to be sympathetic to this transformative use of technology, not least because today’s professions (medicine and dentistry), as currently organized, are creaking. They are increasingly unaffordable, opaque, and inefficient, and they fail to deliver value evenly across our communities. In most advanced economies, there is concern about the spiraling costs of health care, the lack of access to justice, the inadequacy of current educational systems, and the failure of auditors to recognize and stop various financial scandals. The professions need to change. Technology may force them to.”

He has followed that up today:

….below is a copy of a Patent Application that is in process and its associated claim document.  Like everything else, from computers to man-powered flight, when an idea whose time has come arrives, numbers of people in different parts of the globe work on it simultaneously.

…..over the next decade, robotics in dentistry will play a larger and larger role, until dentists become computer operators not dental clinicians. 

It doesn’t matter if you believe me or not, the future doesn’t care about right and wrong.  The future is impartial to “what already is.”

Patent Application – http://www.sumobrain.com/patents/wipo/Medical-robotic-works-station/WO2016022347A1.pdf

Patent Claims– PDF

 one of his correspondents had sent him this: 

Robotics for implant surgery gets FDA clearance. 

http://www.neocis.com/

There’s a completely legal reason this American dentist has an office full of human heads. In case you missed. TGBSL #26

Research

TGBSL explained here

There’s a completely legal reason this American dentist has an office full of human heads

Jordan Sparks found cryonics while sifting through the Portland State University library as a student in the early 1990s. He was fascinated. He stayed fascinated through dental school, and as a practicing dentist, and while building a dental management software whose success has given him the freedom these days to pursue the dream of a deep-frozen future full time. Continues

More dental news:

1 Periodontitis may be an early sign of type 2 diabetes More.

2 Tailored preventive oral health intervention improves dental health among elderly

A tailored preventive oral health intervention significantly improved the cleanliness of teeth and dentures among elderly home care clients. In addition, functional ability and cognitive function were strongly associated with better oral hygiene, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. The study is part of a larger intervention study, NutOrMed, and the findings were published in the Age and Aging journal. More.

3 Study finds that certain type of children respond better to laughing gas

New research has determined that “focused, mindful children” respond better to nitrous oxide.  More.

4 Estrogen therapy shown effective in reducing tooth and gum diseases in postmenopausal women

Estrogen therapy has already been credited with helping women manage an array of menopause-related issues, including reducing hot flashes, improving heart health and bone density, and maintaining levels of sexual satisfaction. Now a new study suggests that the same estrogen therapy used to treat osteoporosis can actually lead to healthier teeth and gums. The study outcomes are being published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society.  More.

In case you missed…TGBSL #23

Research

TGBSL? see more here.

1. New definition of oral health announced;

“Oral health is multifaceted and includes the ability to speak, smile, smell, taste, touch, chew, swallow, and convey a range of emotions through facial expressions with confidence and without pain, discomfort, and disease of the craniofacial complex,” reads the definition.

More here.

2. Dental implants with antibacterial activity and designed to facilitate integration into the bone.

Mouth infections are currently regarded as the main reason why dental implants fail. A piece of research by the UPV/EHU has succeeded in developing coatings capable of preventing potential bacterial infection and should it arise, eliminate it as well as providing implants with osseointegrating properties, in other words, ones that facilitate anchoring to the bone.

More here.

3. New research suggests e-cigarettes could be harmful to gums

E-CIGARETTES COULD DAMAGE gums and teeth, according to a significant recent study on the effects of vaping on oral health.

Full story here

4. Researchers add to evidence that common bacterial cause of gum disease may drive rheumatoid arthritis

Investigators at Johns Hopkins report they have new evidence that a bacterium known to cause chronic inflammatory gum infections also triggers the inflammatory “autoimmune” response characteristic of chronic, joint-destroying rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The new findings have important implications for prevention and treatment of RA, say the researchers.

Full story here

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