Robotics on the way…

Dr Marc Cooper a dentist turned business consultant, understands all elements of the business of dentistry. Never afraid to be provocative and often way ahead of the curve, his newsletter is amongst my top ten regular must reads.

He has written in recent times about the transformational nature of technology and the growth of robotics and AI with a newsletter, “The End of Dentists as We Know Them” where he quoted from Susskind and Susskind’s HBR paper

Our inclination is to be sympathetic to this transformative use of technology, not least because today’s professions (medicine and dentistry), as currently organized, are creaking. They are increasingly unaffordable, opaque, and inefficient, and they fail to deliver value evenly across our communities. In most advanced economies, there is concern about the spiraling costs of health care, the lack of access to justice, the inadequacy of current educational systems, and the failure of auditors to recognize and stop various financial scandals. The professions need to change. Technology may force them to.”

He has followed that up today:

….below is a copy of a Patent Application that is in process and its associated claim document.  Like everything else, from computers to man-powered flight, when an idea whose time has come arrives, numbers of people in different parts of the globe work on it simultaneously.

…..over the next decade, robotics in dentistry will play a larger and larger role, until dentists become computer operators not dental clinicians. 

It doesn’t matter if you believe me or not, the future doesn’t care about right and wrong.  The future is impartial to “what already is.”

Patent Application – http://www.sumobrain.com/patents/wipo/Medical-robotic-works-station/WO2016022347A1.pdf

Patent Claims– PDF

 one of his correspondents had sent him this: 

Robotics for implant surgery gets FDA clearance. 

http://www.neocis.com/

There’s a completely legal reason this American dentist has an office full of human heads. In case you missed. TGBSL #26

Research

TGBSL explained here

There’s a completely legal reason this American dentist has an office full of human heads

Jordan Sparks found cryonics while sifting through the Portland State University library as a student in the early 1990s. He was fascinated. He stayed fascinated through dental school, and as a practicing dentist, and while building a dental management software whose success has given him the freedom these days to pursue the dream of a deep-frozen future full time. Continues

More dental news:

1 Periodontitis may be an early sign of type 2 diabetes More.

2 Tailored preventive oral health intervention improves dental health among elderly

A tailored preventive oral health intervention significantly improved the cleanliness of teeth and dentures among elderly home care clients. In addition, functional ability and cognitive function were strongly associated with better oral hygiene, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. The study is part of a larger intervention study, NutOrMed, and the findings were published in the Age and Aging journal. More.

3 Study finds that certain type of children respond better to laughing gas

New research has determined that “focused, mindful children” respond better to nitrous oxide.  More.

4 Estrogen therapy shown effective in reducing tooth and gum diseases in postmenopausal women

Estrogen therapy has already been credited with helping women manage an array of menopause-related issues, including reducing hot flashes, improving heart health and bone density, and maintaining levels of sexual satisfaction. Now a new study suggests that the same estrogen therapy used to treat osteoporosis can actually lead to healthier teeth and gums. The study outcomes are being published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society.  More.

In case you missed…TGBSL #23

Research

TGBSL? see more here.

1. New definition of oral health announced;

“Oral health is multifaceted and includes the ability to speak, smile, smell, taste, touch, chew, swallow, and convey a range of emotions through facial expressions with confidence and without pain, discomfort, and disease of the craniofacial complex,” reads the definition.

More here.

2. Dental implants with antibacterial activity and designed to facilitate integration into the bone.

Mouth infections are currently regarded as the main reason why dental implants fail. A piece of research by the UPV/EHU has succeeded in developing coatings capable of preventing potential bacterial infection and should it arise, eliminate it as well as providing implants with osseointegrating properties, in other words, ones that facilitate anchoring to the bone.

More here.

3. New research suggests e-cigarettes could be harmful to gums

E-CIGARETTES COULD DAMAGE gums and teeth, according to a significant recent study on the effects of vaping on oral health.

Full story here

4. Researchers add to evidence that common bacterial cause of gum disease may drive rheumatoid arthritis

Investigators at Johns Hopkins report they have new evidence that a bacterium known to cause chronic inflammatory gum infections also triggers the inflammatory “autoimmune” response characteristic of chronic, joint-destroying rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The new findings have important implications for prevention and treatment of RA, say the researchers.

Full story here

If you’re in London on Thursday evening head for Kings.

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A smorgasbord of Dental talent.

Kishan Sheth and the KCL Dental Society join forces to bring you one of the most anticipated dental events of the year. Chaired by Dr Lewis-Greene, supported by Prof Dunne and sponsored by Henry Schein.

www.facebook.com/kcl.dentalsociety/

5.30-8.30pm

Thursday 8th December 2016

New Hunt’s House Lecture Theatre 1, Guy’s Campus, King’s College,  London

Speakers:

  • Dr Raj Ahlowalia
  • Dr Subir Banerji
  • Dr Anoop Maini
  • Dr Alun Rees
  • Dr Nilesh Parmar
  • Mr Kishan Sheth

Attendees receive 2.5 hours CPD certificates or certificates of attendance for students.

£3 donation upon entry for Evelina Children’s Hospital.

By the end of the evening we would like to have raised £1000 for this amazing cause.

Seats allocated on first come first served basis.

What’s not to like?

RCS warns of risks of increasing litigation pay-outs

rcs-logo

The Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) has warned that NHS trusts risk facing a dramatic increase in the number of litigation pay-outs made if they do not make changes to the processes they use to gain consent from patients before surgery. The warning comes after a landmark judgment given in a Supreme Court case in 2015, Montgomery vs Lanarkshire Health Board, clarified our understanding of patient consent.

The Royal College of Surgeons has today published new guidance for surgeons that aims to help doctors and surgeons understand the shift in the law and its implications, as well as give them the tools to assist in improving their practice.

According to the NHS Litigation Authority (NHSLA), which handles medical negligence claims on behalf of hospitals NHS trusts in England paid out more than £1.4 billion in claims during 2015/2016 . The RCS is concerned that this bill could go up significantly if hospitals do not take the Montgomery ruling seriously.

Traditionally clinical practice in the NHS has considered that it is up to doctors to decide what risks to communicate to patients. The court in the Montgomery case changed this and held that doctors must ensure patients are aware of any and all risks that an individual patient, not a doctor, might consider significant. In other words doctors can no longer be the sole arbiter of determining what risks are material to the patient.

Full article here

Consent: Supported Decision-Making – A Guide to Good Practice explains the change in case law and the impact this has on gaining consent from patients. It offers a set of principles to help surgeons support patients to make decisions about their care and gives a step-by-step overview of how the consent process should happen.

Further comments..

Clinical negligence practitioners and patient safety groups have welcomed the new approach to consent. However, the organisational challenge now facing the NHS is considerable. Clinicians already adopting the new guidelines report that typical consultation times have increased, often due to the need for a senior doctor with experience of a range of treatments to talk through the options in detail.

Kirsten Wall, partner in the clinical negligence department at Leigh Day, said of the RCS’s new guidelines: ‘This new approach to obtaining a patient’s consent is an important step away from the previous approach of ‘doctor knows best’ to allowing patients the opportunity to weigh up all the risks and alternative treatment options so they can make a decision that is right for them and their family’.

Tales from Phoenix #1 – Orthodontics

logo_scuba diver_vert_FINLast week I spent two days in Phoenix Arizona at the excellent ConationNation conference organised by Kolbe Corp. The conference was as inspiring and educational as usual and, as ever with these things, one learns much during the breaks.

One of the great conversations was with someone who works for a brokerage that sells orthodontic practices and therefore finds suitable purchasers for them. The costs involved means that it is rare for anyone to be able to buy a practice upfront and a period of associateship / purchase is involved. (That’s another conversation with relevance to the current UK market). What she didn’t know about the finances of orthodontics wasn’t worth knowing; so that’s treatment patterns, types, costs involved, etc etc. She has 12 years or so experience purely in the orthodontic business (and a background in dental management prior to that) and Initiates in Fact Finder and really knew her stuff.

She has watched the rise of General Practice led orthodontics and the effect that it has had on both specialist and general practices amongst other phenomena. Invisalign has led and promoted, and continues vigorously to promote, the commoditisation of orthodontics – so people are buying a thing first and foremost, not a personalised service. In the USA people are more often buying purely on price – a price that is reducing all the time. The numbers that need to be seen would make the NHS look like a doddle – one orthodontist seeing 120 patients a day – sure they are delegating to assistants but….

We agreed our conclusion by saying the same phrase at the same time, that in view of the widespread availability of treatment, “it’s a race to the bottom”.

OK in the (USA) it’s a more mature market, but there are significant lessons to be learned ahead of the same thing happening on the eastern side of the Atlantic – or is it too late? The only people making real money are the ones who sell the tools, toys and systems or perhaps the ones who put right the treatments that go wrong and there are plenty. And let’s not forget the lawyers who chase them.

White House Report Concludes That Bite-Mark Analysis Is Junk Science

Don’t shoot the messenger..

imagesTHE PRESIDENT’S COUNCIL of Advisors on Science and Technology has concluded that forensic bite-mark evidence is not scientifically valid and is unlikely ever to be validated, according to a draft report obtained by The Intercept. The report, titled “Forensic Science in Criminal Courts: Ensuring Scientific Validity of Feature-Comparison Methods,” is marked as a “predecisional” draft created August 26 that is not to be quoted or distributed, though the title page suggests the report will be made public sometime this month.

Continues here