Kolbe – My Decade of Success – What’s Your Kolbe?

WebIt’s nearly ten years since I completed my Kolbe Accreditation, since then I have shared the my knowledge with hundreds of individuals and helped many teams understand how instinct is so important in knowing themselves and their teams. So over the next few weeks I am revisiting some articles that I wrote back then.

What’s Your KOLBE™?

One of the biggest challenges to any clinician and small business owner is the blending of individuals together to make a team.

These are the same challenges that can afflict larger businesses and corporations too.

  • Do you recruit people then find they aren’t quite what you thought?
  • Are you beset with problems retaining staff?
  • Do have difficulties integrating the individuals into a team?
  • Is your hygienist outside the wire?
  • Do your associates fail to embrace your vision for the future?

The KOLBE Wisdom™

  • Identifies the striving instincts that drive natural behaviours.
  • Focuses on the strengths of your team.

The KOLBE A Index is a 36-question survey that reveals the individual mix of striving instincts; it measures individual energies in:

  • Fact Finder – Gathering and sharing of information.
  • Follow through – Sorting and Storing Information.
  • Quick Start – Dealing with risk and uncertainty.
  • Implementation – Handling space and intangibles.

The results are a serious of ‘scores’. Mine for instance is 6/3/8/3, this isn’t the place to give full analysis, my PA’s is 8/8/1/4 which means we work together well.

Hence the question: What’s your KOLBE?

Some background. Kathy Kolbe is a well-known and highly honoured author and theorist who has been working in the field of human behaviour for nearly 40 years. Following on from her scientific studies of learning differences between children she devised The Kolbe Wisdom™, which has been used by such businesses as Kodak, IBM and Xerox and many others around the world. It is now available for use with smaller teams.

The Kolbe Wisdom™ is based on the concept that creative instincts are the source of the mental energy that drives people to take specific actions. This mental drive is separate and distinct from passive feelings and thoughts. Creative instincts are manifested in an innate pattern (modus operandi, or MO) that determines each person’s best efforts.

These conative or instinctive traits are what make us get things done. They should be differentiated from the cognitive (knowledge) or the affective (feelings). As Kathy Kolbe has written, “The conative is the clincher in the decision making hierarchy. Intelligence helps you determine a wise choice, emotions dictate what you’d like to buy, but until the conative kicks in, you don’t make a deal – you don’t put your money where your mouth is.”

Conation doesn’t define what you can or can’t do, rather what you will and won’t do.

A person’s MO is quantifiable and observable, yet functions at the subconscious level. MOs vary across the general population with no gender, age or racial bias.

An individual’s MO governs actions, reactions and interactions. The MO also determines a person’s use of time and his or her natural form of communication. Exercising control over this mental resource gives people the freedom to be their authentic selves.

Any interference with the use of this energy reduces a person’s effectiveness and the joy of accomplishment. Stress inevitably results from the prolonged disruption of the flow of this energy. Others can nurture this natural ability but block it by attempting to alter it.

Individual performance can be predicted with great accuracy by comparing instinctive realities, self-expectations and requirements. It will fluctuate based on the appropriateness of expectations and requirements.

When groups of people with the right mix of MOs function interactively, the combined mental energy produces synergy. Such a team can perform at a higher level than is possible for the same group functioning independently.

Team performance is accurately predicted by a set of algorithms that determine the appropriate balance and make up of MOs.

Leaders can optimise individual and group performance by:

  • Giving people the freedom to be themselves.
  • Assigning jobs suited to individual strengths.
  • Building synergistic teams.
  • Reducing obstacles that cause debilitating stress.
  • Rewarding committed use of instinctive energy.
  • Allowing for the appropriate use of time.
  • Communicating in ways that trigger the effective use of the natural, universal and unbiased energy of creative instincts.

Any  team is as good as:

  • The conative fit each individual has with his or her individual role.
  • The members are, in accurately predicting the differences between each other.
  • The management of the team is, in using the talent available.

In dentistry the use of Kolbe does not only help build the right teams. When the concepts are understood and applied to clinical situations or ones of patient choice and treatment planning then resistance can be handled and the correct way of presentation used.

There are only two fully trained and currently accredited KOLBE Consultants in the UK.

There is only one experienced in working with Dentists and their teams. 

Take YOUR Kolbe A analysis here

If you would like to find out more about using these fantastic tools in your practice or if you would be interested in a presentation to your study group or society get in touch via the contact form below or call me on 0044 7778 148583.

A Collection of Smart, Friendly Individuals Does Not Constitute a Productive Team

www.dentalbusinesscoach.co.uk/services/building-the-perfect-team

From Kolbe connection

Today’s environment of rapidly accelerating change continuously gives birth to new markets, new solutions, and new opportunities.  Consequently, business structures everywhere have become decentralized and more fluid as managers are discovering the critical importance of highly responsive and productive “teams.” Today, the work force at a large organization typically comprises teams that assemble and dissolve in response to specific needs.  And when it comes to developing leaders for an organization, a business owner is less inclined to look for a lone superhero who will lead the way to profitability, and more inclined to find “team builders” who can achieve results within a changing business landscape.

So, what’s the best way to build a highly productive team?  Do you search for individuals with specific skills and a certain level of intelligence?  Or should you look for people with complementary personalities and similar life experiences?

According to a recent article in The Economist, “Teams work best if their members have a strong common culture.”1  Fair enough.  But if that is all there is to assembling a productive team, then why do so many teams with a common culture fail to achieve desired results?

Think about it – whether we’re talking about business, sports, or other activities, we’ve all known of (or even been part of) a cohesive group of skilled, intelligent individuals that still could not achieve anything close to the potential of the combined talents of its members.

On the other hand, many teams function very well in spite of the fact that they do not include the most talented or even the most intelligent individuals available.  Additionally, some highly successful teams (in sports and in business) have included individuals who do not even like each other.

In truth, “common culture” has little to do with team building.  Assembling people who like each other and who have similar personalities may be a good recipe for a social club – but it’s not the way to build a highly productive team.

The most important factor in team building lies in how each member of the team will take action – in other words, their conative MOs, or natural way of problem solving. A team of highly skilled, highly intelligent, and friendly individuals will have a very low chance of success if it suffers from a lack of conative diversity (i.e., “cloning”).  For example, a team of smart players all of whom are detailed, thorough and specific (initiating Fact Finders) may consider themselves to be very compatible with one another.  However, in the absence of anyone who simplifies, finds shortcuts or creates a sense of urgency, the team will likely collect truckloads of data but never accomplish a darned thing.

On the other hand, a team of change agents experimenting and improvising options (initiating Quick Starts) might create (and even execute) several innovative strategies within just a few days, but never achieve their objectives because no one has gathered sufficient background data to justify their solutions.  Additionally, since the team includes no one who was designing systems and bringing closure to open initiatives and ensuring that proper procedures were followed, the team might produce more problems than solutions.

To build a highly productive team, a manager (or a coach) should look for individuals with different conative strengths – people who will bring out the most in their teammates.  That means finding people who “initiate” and people who “counteract” in each of the four Acion Modes® (Fact Finder, Follow Thru, Quick Start, and Implementor).  And don’t forget the importance of finding individuals who will “ReAct” and pull the team together!

During “March Madness,” the best college basketball teams from all over the country put their reputations on the line and compete in a single-elimination tournament.  For a few teams, individual talents come together in beautiful harmony.  These teams are often said to be “playing over their heads.” However, such descriptions don’t come close to capturing the poetry of five different players meshing on the court.  When a coach knows the individual strengths of each player and then deftly mixes and matches these talents as the game progresses, and the players accept that their individual talents are magnified when they play in concert with one another, that’s when synergy is achieved, and usually a new national champion is born.

What’s true for teams on the basketball court is also true for teams in the office: The talent, personality, and intelligence of the individual members are important factors; however, in the end, those teams with the right balance of conative strengths will stand the best chance of victory!

www.dentalbusinesscoach.co.uk/services/building-the-perfect-team

 

The NHS needs real doctors not “Spin Doctors”

I know it’s easy to kick the NHS when it’s down but is this really the right use of resources and is it advertised in the right way? It reads like BS to me.

(I’ll be back next year but no less cynical)

From the Guardian online.

LONDON NORTH WEST HEALTHCARE NHS TRUST
Head of Communications
Salary: £59,987 – £72,244 inc. London weighting allowance (Band 8c)
Full time (37.5hrs/week)
Location: Northwick Park Hospital
Applications for this vacancy will only be accepted via our website using reference: 913998387
We are looking for a dynamic, enthusiastic and highly experienced communications/PR professional with tenacity and drive to meet the many exciting challenges and opportunities facing London North West Healthcare NHS Trust. This is a pivotal time for us as we pursue a transformational programme of activity to improve the way healthcare is delivered across the acute and community settings in North West London.
In October the Trust celebrated its first anniversary, one year on from its creation as a result of the merger between Ealing Hospital NHS Trust and The North West London Hospitals NHS Trust. The new organisation, London North West Healthcare, is one of the largest integrated NHS Trusts in the country. We employ almost 8,500 staff and provide care to a diverse population of approximately 850,000 people across four hospital sites and through community services in the London boroughs of Brent, Ealing and Harrow.
During this exciting period of opportunity and change, it will be your job to support the Trust as we transform the way we communicate and engage with staff, the public and our many stakeholders. This includes providing high level, professional advice on all aspects of communications, including staff and stakeholder engagement, whilst maximising opportunities to promote the positive work of the Trust.
You will be responsible for developing and implementing internal and external communications plans in support of the Trust’s emerging organisational strategy and will help to share examples of best practice, supporting improvement across the Trust following our inspection by the Care Quality Commission.
You will work closely with the Director of Strategy and members of the Board, providing strategic direction on all communication and engagement issues, ensuring that all stakeholders are fully informed about, and engaged in, the work of London North West Healthcare NHS Trust.
If you are a talented individual with tactical, hands on experience who can deliver the challenging, complex and exciting communication needs of the Trust – we want to hear from you. No two days will be the same.
Apply online and access a full job description and person specification at our website via the button below.
Closing date: 10 January 2016.

I have the perfect candidate – or perhaps she wrote it?:

Zero-hour contracts – a good thing for some.

zero_hour_cloc_450As I’m about to have breakfast with an employment lawyer I thought I’d share this report from the CIPD (Chartered Institute for Personnel and Development) about the contentious subject of zero-hours contracts. They conclude that:

Zero-hours and short-hours contracts look set to become a permanent feature of the UK labour market. We estimate that the number of zero-hours contracts has increased from about 1 million in 2013 to about 1.3 million in 2015, and about 400,000 employees are on short-hours contracts that guarantee up to eight hours’ work a week.

This report looks at how and why employers use zero-hours and short-hours contracts and considers the characteristics, attitudes and preferences of employees on these types of contract. It is based on an analysis of data from the CIPD’s Labour Market Outlook and Employee Outlook surveys.

Our findings show that approximately 25% of employers use zero-hours contracts. While workers on these contracts may be less likely to feel involved at work and see fewer opportunities to develop and improve their skills than employees as a whole, they are also less likely to feel overloaded and under excessive pressure. The proportion of zero-hours contract and short-hours contract employees who say they are satisfied or very satisfied with their jobs – 65% and 67% respectively – is slightly higher than the proportion of employees as a whole (63%).

In the CIPD’s view, the available evidence does not provide a strong case for further legislation to regulate the use of zero-hours contracts, and the best way to improve the working lives of the zero-hours contract workforce is to help more employers understand why they need to develop flexible and fair working practices and how to implement them.

‘An outright ban on zero-hours contracts could do more harm than good. Prohibiting contracts that give employees an option to turn work down could lead to some of them withdrawing from the labour force.’

This report updates and extends the analysis of zero-hours contract work presented in the 2013 report:
Zero-hours contracts: myth and reality.

To download and read the full report take a look at their website here.

Narcissistic leaders – who do you know who fits the bill?

From “The Conversation.com” piece, “The appeal of narcissistic leaders is also their downfall“.

It left me thinking about those I have trusted, why I have trusted them, which have disappointed me and how quickly. (why is that Tony Blair is the first person to come to mind I wonder?).

“From the sports field to the battlefield, from business to politics, ineffective leaders often shoulder the blame when things go wrong. Perhaps we should be more careful about who we put in charge. Our research has found that your personality – and how narcissistic you are – is linked to how effective you are as a leader. We found that narcissists may appear to be good leaders early on, but they soon fall out of favour.

U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump takes a selfie with a supporter as he prepares to leave a campaign event in Anderson, South Carolina October 19, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Keane TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTS5663

Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump has been called a ‘textbook narcissist’.

As we choose the leaders around us, we often think we are making informed choices about who is most effective. But our research suggests that this is not always the case. In fact, we are more likely to select as leaders those people who display narcissistic traits.

Those who score highly in narcissism tests believe they are special people who are superior. They also report high levels of confidence, are focused on themselves at the expense of others, and are vain. These overly positive views of themselves help narcissists to perform very well in situations that offer them an opportunity for personal glory, such as performing under pressure, performing tasks that are difficult, and doing things in the presence of others.

But when they perceive that there is no such opportunity, narcissists withdraw their effort and perform poorly. Because narcissists are so focused on personal glory they can be difficult team members; yet they might make good leaders. Positions of leadership provide an opportunity to gain glory from others and so are likely to be attractive to the narcissist.

The leader ship is sinking

Others have researched and written about the idea of narcissists as leaders, but until now there has been no evidence of whether or not narcissists actually do make effective leaders in the long term.

In two studies, we assessed people’s narcissism using the Narcissistic Personality Inventory – a standard narcissism questionnaire used in psychology research. Example items include: “If I ruled the world it would be a much better place” and “I am an extraordinary person”. People were asked to score themselves against these items on a scale of 0 to 40, with higher scores indicating higher levels of narcissism. Our mean scores were just under 14 for both the studies which is consistent with most research using similar participants.

We then asked people to work in small groups, completing weekly tasks for 12 weeks. Examples of tasks included naming all the Team GB medallists at the 2012 London Olympics and identifying the states of the USA on a blank map. In the first study (using 112 first-year students, 71 men and 41 women, working in 24 groups in their first semester at university) we deliberately allocated people to groups so that they would be unlikely to know each other. In the second study, we used individuals who knew each other reasonably well (152 final year students, 96 men and 56 women, working as part of 29 groups) and let them choose their own groups.

Both during and at the end of the 12 weeks, the participants rated each other on their leadership effectiveness. The results were striking. Initially, the people who had scored highest on the narcissism test were rated as highly effective, but as time went on these positive perceptions waned until eventually narcissists were seen as very ineffective leaders. Although we expected narcissists not to last long as leaders, we were amazed by how rapidly they lost favour with their group, and how negatively they were viewed by the end. Over time, the narcissistic leaders’ ships sank.

Are narcissistic leaders doomed to fail?

Our results showed that the group was initially attracted to the narcissist’s charisma and vision, which allowed the narcissists to rise as the “natural” leaders. But over a very short time, narcissistic leaders failed to provide their followers with appropriate levels of challenge or support. This ultimately led to their downfall.

Although our data painted a rather negative picture for narcissists in the long run, it is not all doom and gloom for the narcissistic leader. The challenge for them is to be able to harness their charisma and combine it with other factors such as humility or empathy, which should enable them to be seen as effective leaders over time. An extreme narcissist may not care what others think of them and may be doomed to fail in leadership roles. But there are other narcissism traits that may be more effective and even necessary, in some forms of diplomacy for example – such as narcissistic charm.

Being able to choose between leaders who we “like” in the short term and those who we believe will get the job done and be effective over time is not necessarily an easy task. Dealing with this paradox is vital to be able to ensure effective leadership in the long term.

A great opportunity for the right person in Cheltenham

steel-entrance-sign

From my friends Tim and Alison Rumney who run Illume Dentistry in Cheltenham:

ILLUME is looking for a special dentist to join a long established private practice for three days a week in a sought after location on the edge of the Cotswolds.

Can you say yes to these?

  • You are developing a varied skill set to match the changing dental market with excellent diagnostic ability
  • You are a great communicator
  • You take pride in providing painless, quality dentistry that lasts
  • You understand the benefits of being part of a synergistic team
  • You are searching for an opportunity that will give you the right work life balance
  • You are willing to be mentored, have high self-esteem and self confidence
  • You share our values of building trust, rapport and long-term relationships with our clients
  • You understand that attitude is everything

We are offering

  • An excellent clinical and non-clinical environment and client journey delivered by a team who understand first class customer care
  • Excellent pay for high performance

If you like what you have read so far and are ready for an exciting opportunity please send your letter of application and CV by September 30th to Alison Rumney, Non-Clinical Director at Illume, 3a Queens Road, Cheltenham, GL50 2LR, T: 01242 522230, E: alison@illumedentistry.co.uk

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