It ain’t what you do, it’s the way that you do it.

The recent CIPD research in partnership with Simply Health was completed in November 2018 and covered more than 3.2 million employees across the UK.

The top causes of long term sickness were mental ill health & stress with 59% & 54% respectively.

 

 

The top three causes of stress related illness are:

  • Workloads / volume of work.  62%
  • Management style.   43%
  • Relationships at work. 30%

Your style as a manager needs to vary depending upon the different environments and employees. Management styles can be categorised as autocratic, democratic and laissez faire. What do you think your’s is?

If you need help with either your own management style or your managers’ style then drop me a line at alunrees@mac.com – it’s what I’m here for.

The full report is available here.

CIPD’s Top tips to support managers to minimise stress in their teams is available here.

 

 

Patient? Customer? Client? What really matters.

An interesting conversation in a practice about what the people that are treated/served/cared for should be called. I have been around the block a couple of times over the past 30 odd years and have returned to, and will remain with, patients. But that’s my opinion, you use whatever is comfortable for you.

“We sometimes make assumptions based on our opinions about a customer’s Patient’s wants and needs.

It’s hard to be objective about our ideas when we are invested in the outcome.

But that shouldn’t stop us trying to stand in our customer’s Patient’s shoes for long enough to understand how he feels.

Our opinion is immaterial if it doesn’t align with the story the customer Patient believes.”

Adapted from Bernadette Jiwa.

Productive moi?

When analysing dental businesses and individual team members I try to keep in mind “5 E”s that apply to successful clinical practice, effective, ergonomic, economic, ethical, efficient. I have always believed that principals, and those who truly have “skin in the game” perform better on most, if not all, of the “5 E”s.

The workforce generally could learn a lot from some of my case studies.

RBS Chief Economist’s Weekly Brief – Shifting sands

Harder, better, faster, stronger?  Hardly.  Yet another year has passed without any productivity growth in the UK.  In fact, output per hour worked actually fell 0.2% over the year to Q4 2018.  The only reason the economy grew at all was because more people worked than ever before.  Yet each worker now produces a mere 2% more than before the 2008 recession struck (whereas our American cousins are churning out 15% more every hour worked).  Bad news is that the awful run is unlikely to let-up soon; both weak investment and slowing trade are likely to drag on productivity growth in 2019.

If you’re in Dublin on March 2nd

My maternal grandparents would be proud of me being selected for Croke Park. I’ll not be gracing the hallowed turf with my prowess with sliotar and hurley. Instead I’ll be up on level 5 in the Hogan suite on the 5th Floor with a Taster session of “The 101 Things They Didn’t Teach You At Dental School”.

Herb Kelleher – Cheap can be cheerful

Herb Kelleher was the co-founder of Southwest Airlines, he died earlier this month. He had many attributes that I admire, not least of which was introducing a culture to the company where Southwest’s employees took themselves lightly but their jobs seriously.

 

Kelleher had a simple philosophy, “A motivated employee treats the customer well. The customer is happy, so they keep coming back. It’s not one of the enduring mysteries of all time; it is just the way it works.”

An article in the FT Michael Skapinker which celebrated Herb, contrasted his outlook with a recent email from a disappointed British Airways passenger. Skapinker concluded with this statement, “few people come to work intending to be unhelpful. If they are horrible, it is usually because their bosses are horrible to them, or they prioritise sticking to the rules, or cutting costs, over keeping customers happy.”

In 1987 Michael O’Leary (of RyanAir) visited Southwest Airlines and Herb Kelleher to learn about the airline industry. Although there were plans for them to meet again, O’Leary never went back to complete his tuition.

Read more about Southwest’s business model here.

 

 

Tea Pillow?

The renaming of what most of us would call a tea bag into a “Hand-Stitched Tea Pillow” smacks of a very long lunch in the marketing department. Nice tea though.

The Monday Morning Quote #518

“Plan for what is difficult while it is easy.

Do what is great while it is small.”

Sun Tzu

%d bloggers like this: