In case you missed – TGBSL #29….Dentistry courses dominated by women in Scotland.

TGBSL explained: In the second book of the semi-autobiographical series describing the progress of an Edinburgh medical graduate, Colin Douglas describes his hero, David Campbell’s, involvement with medical research. The book’s title is “The Greatest Breakthrough Since Lunchtime“ and the cynic in me always remembers it when I read headlines like these. I insist that I have a huge regard for our researchers, having watched my brother persevere with his work for years and now my son wrestle with a PhD I know that it is something to which I am not suited at all.

1) New discovery could reduce the dental implant failure rate

Scientists have developed a new nanocoating that’s designed to reduce the risk of dental implant failure.

Dental implants are a common and effective tooth replacement option, which is why it’s no surprise that about 3 million Americans have dental implants. That number is rising by 500,000 people each year, according to the American Academy of Implant Dentistry.

While dental implants are a great option for many patients, a major issue is the implant failure rate. According to a 2015 study, almost 8 percent of patients with dental implants experienced the loss of at least one implant over a 9-year period.

To combat the dental implant failure rate, scientists from the School of Biological Sciences, Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry and the School of Engineering at the University of Plymouth have developed a new nanocoating for dental implants that’s designed to reduce the risk of peri-implantitis. Peri-implantitis is a localized lesion involving bone loss around an osseointegrated implant. It has been identified as the main reason for dental implant failure.

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2) Those with dental phobia more likely to have cavities or missing teeth, study confirms

I’m afraid this falls into the category of, “specialist subject – the bleedin’ obvious”.

When I tried this on a few people in the pub the overwhelming response was, “1) Frightened to go, 2) allow problems to get worse until 3) you have to go, 4) get in, 5) get it over with, 6) get out, 7) fear remains. Return to 1).

People with dental phobia are more likely to have active caries or missing teeth, a new study from King’s College London has confirmed.

The latest study, published in the British Dental Journal, aimed to explore the social and demographic correlates of oral health and oral health related quality of life of people with dental phobia compared to those without dental phobia. The findings showed that people with dental phobia are more likely to have one or more decayed teeth, and missing teeth as well. In addition, the study showed that those with dental phobias’ reported that their oral health related quality of life is poor.

Full paper HERE

 

3) Medicine, dentistry and law courses dominated by women in Scotland

via BDA

Full Report HERE

GIRLS are continuing to dominate leading professions such as medicine, dentistry and the law, according to new analysis.

Figures collated by academics from Edinburgh University show more than 56 per cent of students studying medicine and dentistry in Scotland are women while the same is true of 63 per cent of those studying law….continues

She said: “Recent decades have seen a shift in the policy discussion of gender and education away from a focus on female disadvantage towards a concern with male underachievement. To a certain extent this is because of a culture of laddishness which means boys are more likely to act up, more likely to be the subject of punitive disciplinary measures and are therefore more likely to be disengaged. In contrast there is still a sense girls are more likely to be better behaved, to spend more time reading for pleasure and doing homework.” REALLY?

 

New research discovers way to eliminate needles for dental anaesthetic and other stories. In case you missed it TGBSL #28

New research discovers way to eliminate needles for dental anesthetic

A new study from the University of São Paulo found that there might be no need for needles when administering anesthetic for dental procedures.

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Bioengineered tooth restoration in a large mammal

Researchers at Okayama University report in Scientific Reports successful tooth regeneration in a postnatal large-animal model. The approach used involves the autologous transplantation of bioengineered tooth germ into a canine jawbone; the in vivo artificially created tooth has the structure, composition and physiological characteristics of a natural tooth.

More HERE

New study identifies successful method to reduce dental implant failure

According to the American Academy of Implant Dentistry (AAID), 15 million Americans have crown or bridge replacements and three million have dental implants – with this latter number rising by 500,000 a year. The AAID estimates that the value of the American and European market for dental implants will rise to $4.2 billion by 2022.

Dental implants are a successful form of treatment for patients, yet according to a study published in 2005, five to 10 per cent of all dental implants fail.

Continues HERE

There’s a completely legal reason this American dentist has an office full of human heads. In case you missed. TGBSL #26

Research

TGBSL explained here

There’s a completely legal reason this American dentist has an office full of human heads

Jordan Sparks found cryonics while sifting through the Portland State University library as a student in the early 1990s. He was fascinated. He stayed fascinated through dental school, and as a practicing dentist, and while building a dental management software whose success has given him the freedom these days to pursue the dream of a deep-frozen future full time. Continues

More dental news:

1 Periodontitis may be an early sign of type 2 diabetes More.

2 Tailored preventive oral health intervention improves dental health among elderly

A tailored preventive oral health intervention significantly improved the cleanliness of teeth and dentures among elderly home care clients. In addition, functional ability and cognitive function were strongly associated with better oral hygiene, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. The study is part of a larger intervention study, NutOrMed, and the findings were published in the Age and Aging journal. More.

3 Study finds that certain type of children respond better to laughing gas

New research has determined that “focused, mindful children” respond better to nitrous oxide.  More.

4 Estrogen therapy shown effective in reducing tooth and gum diseases in postmenopausal women

Estrogen therapy has already been credited with helping women manage an array of menopause-related issues, including reducing hot flashes, improving heart health and bone density, and maintaining levels of sexual satisfaction. Now a new study suggests that the same estrogen therapy used to treat osteoporosis can actually lead to healthier teeth and gums. The study outcomes are being published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society.  More.

In case you missed TGBSL #25

Research

“TGBSL” explained here

1) Dental implant with slow-release drug reservoir reduces infection risk

Scientists have developed a dental implant containing a reservoir for the slow release of drugs. Laboratory tests in which the reservoir slowly released a strong antimicrobial agent showed that the new implant can prevent and eliminate bacterial biofilms – a major cause of infection associated with dental implants.

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2) Chewing your food could protect against infection

Researchers have found that chewing food prompts the release of an immune cell that can protect against infection.

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3) Fluoride Rinse and Varnish Equally Effective

Fluoride varnish and fluoride mouthwash appear equally effective in a head-to-head trial and in a review of the literature. The finding shows that practitioners have options in finding the best way to deliver the caries-fighting mineral to patients at high risk for the condition. Although the efficacy of fluoride is well established, much remains unknown about the relative merits of various application methods.

Continues here