The Incisal Edge Podcast – Facebook Advertising for Dentists with Chris Baker

In this episode of the Incisal Edge Podcast Alun Rees talks to Chris Baker about Facebook Advertising.

The third of our interviews with Chris Baker from Corona Dental Marketing


UK adspend: Mobile drives growth

From Benedict Evans’ Newsletter.

Mobile advertising spending overtook TV advertising in the UK (note the effect of the BBC here, though).

LONDON: The UK’s ad market reached a new milestone during the third quarter of 2017 as almost one in four pounds spent on advertising went to mobile, which posted year-on-year growth of 30.7% to £1.3bn, according to Advertising Association/WARC Expenditure Report data published today.

Total ad market growth was recorded at 3.5% year-on-year, with £5.4bn spent during Q3 – the 17th consecutive quarter of market expansion.

The report found that total spend on mobile (including display, search, and other formats such as SMS/MMS) was higher than TV spend for the first time. Yet TV remains the leading display channel.



Interaction Vs Transaction – from The Story of Telling

The Story of Telling is one of my top 10 business blogs, it always gives me something to consider either for myself or to pass on to my clients – and usually both.

Today’s posting, Interaction v Transaction features The Big Issue magazine sellers

….But just because it works doesn’t mean it’s the best strategy for generating the most sales or building the magazine seller’s business….

…..In our hurry to succeed we sometimes overlook the opportunity to engage first and sell later. Marketing works best when it’s anticipated, and the person on the other side of the interaction feels like they have had a hand in the result…. 

Take a minute and read the entry.

We are NOT Goldfish

The Year End clear out – this from 2014! Has anything changed?

I don’t know why I’m still surprised by people who use ad blockers but still spend money on advertising…

Advertising is a huge source of the “data pollution” Fred Wilson talked about at LeWeb a few weeks ago. (See here, starting at about 23 minutes in.)

What’s wrong with this view, and this approach, is the architectural assumption that:

  1. We are consumers and nothing more. Fish in a bowl.
  2. The Net — and the Web especially — is a container.
  3. Advertisers have a right to target us in that container. And to track us so we can be targeted.
  4. Negative externalities, such as data pollution, don’t matter.
  5. This can all be rationalized as an economic necessity.

Yet here is what remains true, regardless of the prevailing assumptions of the marketing world:

  1. We are not fish. Rather, as Cluetrain put it (in 1999!), we are not seats or eyeballs or end users or consumers. we are human beings and our reach exceeds your grasp. deal with it.
  2. The Net was designed as a wide open space where all the intelligence that matters is at its ends, and each of us sits (stands, walks, drives) at one.
  3. Even if advertisers have a legal right to target us, their manners are terrible and doomed for correction.
  4. Negative externalities matter. A lot. As Fred said in his talk, we eventually dealt with the pollution caused by industry, and we’ll deal with it in the virtual world as well.
  5. The larger economic necessity is for a well-functioning marketplace. We’ll get that online once free customers prove more valuable than captive ones.

The key is to replicate online the experience of operating as a free and independent customer in the physical world.

For example, when you go into a store, your default state is anonymity. Unless you are already known by name to the people at the store,  you are nameless by default. This is a civic grace. There is no need to know everybody by name, and to do so might actually slow things down and make the world strange and creepy. (Ask anybody who has lived in a surveillance state, such as East Germany before it fell, what it is like to be followed, or to know you might be followed, all the time.) We haven’t yet invented ways to be anonymous online, or to control one’s anonymity. But that’s a challenge, isn’t it? Meaning it is also a market opportunity.

We’ve lived in a fishbowl long enough. Time to get human. I guarantee there’s a lot more money coming from human beings than from fish whose only utterances are clicks.

Social media gurus

 I get more Linkedin requests from Social Media “experts” than anyone else and 95% of them are ignored. This piece from Gavin Ingham struck a chord.

Two “expert” topics seem to attract chancers more than any others… 1) Social media gurus. 2) Become a millionaire in speaking/coaching/consulting. Obviously, there are good ones too (not many in 2) but many, many selling snake oil.

Simple background checks quickly uncover that many had little or no business before launching out doing these things and many simply rehash courses they went on themselves.

he fact that they look 12, are sitting in their mum’s dining room, are wearing a t-shirt from the Poundshop, or canny string a sentence together also tends to give it away :-).


The Incisal Edge Podcast – Public Relations for Dentists with Chris Baker

In their second conversation in the pod, Alun and Chris Baker from Corona Design & Communications talk about the best way to use local Public Relations to promote your Dental Practice.


The Incisal Edge Podcast – Email marketing for dentists with Chris Baker.

In the first of a series of Podcast conversations about PR and Marketing for Dentists, Alun is joined by Chris Baker from Corona Design and Communications.

Their first topic is Email marketing.

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