One rule for you, one rule for the rest…

Inspired by John Naughton.

Picture this – one dentist manages to lose one set of notes of one patient, who was one month old, who had made one visit to the practice as an emergency and treatment consisted of examination and parental reassurance. The notes are passed to a recognised third party for disposal but turn up on a patch of waste ground. The CQC and the GDC would be involved and that dentist would probably go through months of anxiety whilst it was decided how big the case was for them to answer.

Meanwhile…. “sometime between mid-May and July, Equifax was hacked via a security flaw in the Apache Struts software that it used to build its web applications. The flaw, which gave hackers an easy way to take control of sensitive sites, had been fixed on 6 March and patches were made available to every organisation that used Struts. That meant, as various commentators pointed out, that Equifax’s IT department had the tools to plug the security holeand two months in which to do it. For some reason, they didn’t.

As a result, the hackers were able to steal the personal information of 143 million Americans. It is the most important financial data available on any citizen – names, dates of birth, social security numbers, home addresses and in some instances a lot more, including credit card details of more than 200,000 US consumers (and some UK consumers). It’s everything you need to engage in identity theft on an epic scale. “On a scale of 1 to 10 in terms of risk to consumers,” said a fraud analyst at consultancy firm Gartner, “this is a 10.””….

…Equifax discovered the breach on 29 July, but didn’t reveal it publicly until 7 September, no doubt because the internal investigation was long and complex. During that period, however, three of its senior executives unloaded shares in the company valued at $1.8m. But this, apparently, was completely coincidental: the poor dears (who included the chief financial officer) were not aware that an intrusion had occurred when they sold their shares. 

…..if some poor unfortunate forgets to pay a library fine and then discovers that they can’t get a loan because a check on Equifax’s database reveals the payment lapse, well… that’s just tough. If you want to understand the populist revolt, then this is a good place to start.

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Sometimes you have to be grateful….

I was contacted by a prospective client yesterday who asked for testimonials from clients with whom I currently work or have worked in the past.  I want to thank the several individuals who responded to my emails within minutes with, “of course”, “pleased to help”, “send them my way” and variations on that theme.

Gratitude isn’t a good enough word.

Thanks folks, you know who you are.

CIPD’s Top 6 reasons to go to court

The biggest challenge in Dental Practices through the Spring and Summer of 2017 seemed to be people. I’m not sure if we have greater expectations of our teams and/or our leaders or whether the general feeling of uncertainty (Brexit etc) is manifesting itself in the way we behave towards each other. All I know is I have fielded more questions from clients (& non-clients) about team behaviour than ever before.

CIPD listed their Top 6 Reason employers end up in court and how to avoid it. Full article HERE

1)Discrimination

Why a tricky area of the law is only going to get trickier – and how HR can stay ahead

Among the biggest casualties of the introduction of tribunal fees in 2013 were claims for discrimination – there was a 91 per cent drop in the number of sex discrimination cases in the first year.

The Supreme Court’s decision that fees are unlawful (see page 8) will undoubtedly mean case numbers will rise….

2) TUPE

Service provision changes aren’t exciting, but they could prove costly

It’s the four-letter word every HR professional dreads: TUPE, or the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations, has always been fraught with the potential to confuse because it is highly technical and heavy on detail.

Recent cases have focused on one key aspect of the regulations – whether there has been a service provision change during a transfer, which can then determine which employees retain their current terms and conditions (or not) under TUPE at their new employer….

3) Flexible working

Justifications matter when it comes to granting or denying requests

According to Deloitte’s Millennial Survey 2017, flexible ways of working – whether that’s location, hours or contractual arrangements – are highly valued by workers born between the early 1980s and early 2000s. Those in organisations with a high degree of flexibility are more likely to be loyal to their employer and to say this has a positive impact on their wellbeing and that of the business…

4) Religion

From dress codes to the intricacies of helping people from different faiths work together

When it comes to religion at work, one of the ways it is most visibly expressed is in the way employees dress. Two European cases have provided food for thought on whether employers can be proscriptive with dress codes in relation to religion….

5) Parental leave

Problems over parity between mums and dads could be storing up trouble

With discrimination against women during pregnancy or maternity leave costing businesses close to £280m a year, according to the Equality and Human Rights Commission, parenthood at work is potentially expensive. And discrimination is a particular consideration when it comes to shared parental leave (SPL).

6) Disciplinaries and grievances

Follow the rule book and keep a written record – or be prepared to write a large cheque 

HR isn’t all about the process. But when a disciplinary or grievance makes the news, you can be pretty certain someone, somewhere didn’t follow the rules. Both are situations that organisations strive to resolve informally and internally to avoid a costly tribunal. “Most employees are quite reluctant to raise a formal grievance because they think they will be earmarked as a troublemaker, and employers wish to avoid the fallout,”

The Monday Morning Quote #445

“The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.”

Mark Twain

via Peter Thomson

More people producing less..

From the RBS Chief Economist’s Weekly Briefing.

As far as the jobs market is concerned, we’ve rarely (if ever) had it so good. Yet the link between jobs and pay remains severed. This is unlikely to reunite until productivity improves. And with that, there are few quick fixes.  

Rude health. The last time the British labour market was in such good shape Tammy Wynette was standing by her man. In the three months to June employment was up by 340,000y/y taking the employment rate to a record 75.1%. Unemployment was down by 160,000y/y and the rate fell to 4.4%, its lowest level since 1975. The number of job vacancies slipped a little but there have never been fewer people chasing each job since these records began in 2001. We’ve rarely had it so good.

Tough love The only good thing to say about the UK’s productivity performance between April and June (down 0.1%) is that it was worse between January and March (down 0.5%). Without wishing to be Jeremiah-ish, while full employment provides short term support for the economy, long term prosperity relies on productive advancement. Without it, the economic cake might continue to grow but individual slices may not. The data tell a hard truth. We produce no more per hour of work than in 2008 and only slightly more than we did in 2003. Perhaps stagnant real pay growth is not so unjustified.

 

“Intelligent Tracking Prevention.”

From John Naughton’s Memex.

What’s coming in IoS 11

Ah, at last something interesting:

In September, Apple will release new changes to Safari with iOS 11 called “Intelligent Tracking Prevention.” These changes will have large effects on the ad tech industry and create new winners and losers.

In short, the iOS 11 changes will really help the big guys, are neutral to the small guys and significantly hurt the mid-size guys.

Hmmm… Not sure that this will be a boon to the world (c.f. the stuff about helping the big guys). I’ll continue to use my own protective measures.

…me too.

Life After Dentistry Seminar at The RAF Club

A Very Special Evening at a Very Special Venue.

LIFE AFTER DENTISTRY – HOW TO PLAN AND LIVE YOUR IDEAL RETIREMENT


Join Lily Head from Lily Head Practice Sales, Matt Smith from New Life Financial Planners & Alun Rees, The Dental Business Coach at

The Royal Airforce Club, Piccadilly, London on Thursday 14th September.

If you are a Principal Dentist join us at this seminar which focused on helping dental practice owners achieve the maximum value for their practices and how to convert those funds into the most advantageous retirement plan.

Matt Smith will be discussing, ‘How to retire years early and be financially free, have more income and pay less tax.’ 

Lily Head will be discussing  ‘Market Conditions for Sellers and an overview of the end to end sale process’.

Alun Rees will be discussing ‘Preparing your practice and yourself for transition to becoming “sale ready” and beyond’.

Tap here for details of content.

Tap here to register your interest.

 

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