The more things change…

From the editorial in the current BDJ

Each generation believes that it discovers everything for the first time and suffers each difficulty anew. Is it that a certain personality type was (and is still) attracted to dentistry? If so, does this partly explain today’s burnout statistics as much as it did then? ‘In 1913, Dormer was declared bankrupt, which he stated was caused by continuing ill-health … he had left his previous job as an assistant due to a nervous breakdown but had been unable to work up a business sufficiently large to meet his living expenses, been in financial difficulties for some years and had taken loans from money lenders.’

As usual a great read, and I’ve never been to Bexhill-on-Sea either.

 

Peri-implant Disease

From The Blog of the Campbell Academy. – a routine “must read”.

“….It is absolutely crystal clear the patients who attend for routine maintenance get very little amounts of Peri-implant disease and the disease that they get is hugely treatable.

Whereas it is also absolutely clear that if they don’t attend the incidents of Peri-implant disease goes through the roof.

The number of dental implants placed in the United Kingdom over the last 10 years has rocketed and so here it comes.

Throughout that time there have been countless practitioners who have paid no attention to the fact that we have known for years that maintenance is the key to the reduction in Peri-implant disease…

….Peri-implant disease is a real reality even in the practices of people who do it properly, but for those who don’t it will be a disastrous long-term complication.”

 

Who do you trust? Who can you trust? from GDPUK

My latest post for GDPUK:

One of the main tenets of Professor Onora O’Neill’s arguments around the theme of trust is that we must aim to have more trust in the trustworthy but not in the untrustworthy. She says, “I aim positively to try not to trust the untrustworthy.”

Which brings around the questions. Who can you trust? Who do you trust? And then by extension, Who can trust you? Who does trust you?

All of us exist in different circles. At the centre is the Circle of Control. Sometimes when I talk to dentists and their teams they say that they feel they have little control over their lives, I can understand those feelings but they are not correct. We have control on where our focus is from moment to moment. We choose and can control our reactions to events and to others. We control where and how we spend our time and energy. We control how we turn up every day. We also control how trustworthy we are.

The next circle is The Circle of Influence. In here are the things that concern you and that you are able to Influence. When we look at this closely many of the things that cause us concern are beyond our control and influence.

 

Finally the outer circle is the Circle of Concern. In here lie all the things that concern you in your work and life, including health, family, finances, the general economy and so on. Everything inside the circle matters to you, everything outside the circle is of no concern to you.

The lesson around the circles is to “Focus on what you can control and don’t waste energy on the things that you cannot.” To take a topical theme, it is very unlikely that any of us can control the outcome of the UK’s proposed Brexit deal – yet many are losing sleep, getting anxious, losing friends and letting it dominate their thinking.

Continues HERE.

 

 

Why wouldn’t you?

I have a hoard of unpublished blogposts, some half written, some one line ideas, they are the result of experiences, ideas, conversations, things read, seen or thought.

This one came about after talking to a client about his team routinely recording their patients’ blood pressure and pulse.

Increasingly dentists ought to be seen as Oral Physicians as well as Surgeons and should look at their patients overall health. Often dentists are in a better place to do routine checks than our medical colleagues and should do them before many procedures. This is good practice and those who embrace the role are to be encouraged. They, and their teams, do need to be competent at doing straightforward measurements. It’s something I started (but did not persevere) back in the early 1990s.

These are comments on three patients from the client

  • Nice outcome. Did patient’s BP and it was 210/99, sent her to her GMP as a matter of urgency.
  • Normally he would be hospitalised but treated under own doctor’s care, turns out to have high platelet count.
  • Had to send her away last time as we had potential cardiac issue on our hands. Saw her this time and she was still effusively grateful for us having found this. Saved her from heart attack or stroke.

The client continued:

“I cannot understand why “X” (client’s associate) is reluctant…”

“We should have been doing them years ago….”

What makes some people more productive?

Time management in Dentistry continues to be a massive stumbling block to success especially when “speed” and “effectiveness” are confused, one leaves you knackered at the end of the day and not earning properly, the other brings rewards that you can appreciate.

We all have the same amount of minutes in an hour, hours in a day, days in a week etc. But some people clearly get more done than others. Often there is resentment from the “doing less” camp who say that the achievers cut more corners, don’t do things properly and so on but I find this is mostly sour grapes.

My experience of being in dental practices, operating theatres and offices is that the people who get most done are the ones who plan their days, roll their sleeves up and get on with it, start their day on time, who “eat the frog” as early in the day as possible and build in flexibility for when “stuff” happens.

Pozen and Downey found that the most productive people were good at:

  • overcoming procrastination
  • getting to the final product 
  • focussing on daily accomplishments &
  • delegating clearly and effectively

On the other hand those who scored lower:

  • did not plan their days in advance
  • were easily distracted by the avoidable 
  • did not have great routines &
  • (frequently) blamed others for their lack of productivity

If you want to have a good day you have to decide what a good day is and work backwards. Sadly too many people still let the tail wag the dog.

Summertime and the living ain’t always easy.

The current Newsletter from The Dental Business Coach is available to view here:

Here’s a section:

“Sophisticated Procrastination”


Most people know what they ought to do to succeed but can usually find something to stop them. Frequently they are guilty of getting in their own way. The reasons can be challenging to discover from depleted self-worth, having no idea of what success looks like for them through to not acknowledging that they are in the wrong place.

Although they have the problem and it is their’s alone, they are likely to want to blame something, anything, else. The practice, the principal, the patients, the position, the NHS, the associates.

Often this becomes a form of “sophisticated procrastination” which includes all sorts of excuses. Telling your teacher that the dog ate your homework may be acceptable when you are 10, using an equally lame excuse as an adult makes no difference because it’s only yourself that you’re trying to fool.

One of my roles in life is to hold up a mirror to people, businesses and teams to help them see themselves with greater clarity. Contact me to find out more here.

“Dentistry is Tough”

You know you’re being taken seriously when the incoming BDA President checks your name and writing in their address.

“An opinion piece was recently published in BDJ In Practice by Dr Alun Rees, ‘Is Dentistry making us sick?’ It starts with the statement, ‘Dentistry is tough’. I don’t think any of us would argue with that.”

For Roslyn McMullan’s full Presidential address CLICK HERE – I wish her a successful, productive and happy year and look forward to thanking her when we meet.

 

%d bloggers like this: