To Prevent Rheumatoid Arthritis, Look Past the Joints to the Gums. In Case You Missed It- TGBSL#27

An explanation of TGBSL

To Prevent Rheumatoid Arthritis, Look Past the Joints to the Gums

The mouth may seem like a strange place to search for a culprit in a disease that primarily affects the joints. But a recent collaboration by a group of multidisciplinary researchers suggests that one type of oral bacteria may be an important trigger in about half of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) cases. Continues

Some Neanderthals were vegetarians who used natural forms of penicillin and aspirin as medicine

‘Apparently, Neandertals possessed a good knowledge of medicinal plants … the use of antibiotics would be very surprising, as this is more than 40,000 years before we developed penicillin’ Continues & here

Root canal treatments overhauled through new device to detect untreated bacteria

A new method of detecting bacteria during root canal treatments could eradicate the need for follow up appointments and prevent treatments from failing, according to a study published in the Journal of Dental Research. The SafeRoot device, created by a team of researchers at King’s College London, enables rapid bacterial detection inside the root canal, ensuring the procedure has been successful and reducing the need for tooth extraction or surgical intervention. Continues.

Tooth loss linked to an increased risk of dementia

In a study of 1566 community-dwelling Japanese elderly who were followed for 5 years, the risk of developing dementia was elevated in individuals with fewer remaining teeth. Continues

Can oestrogen therapy lead to healthier teeth and gums?

A new study finds links between estrogen therapy and reducing tooth and gum diseases in postmenopausal women. Estrogen therapy is known to help women manage a variety of menopause-related issues: improving bone density and heart health and reducing hot flashes, to name a few. As such, many women choose to take hormones to treat the numerous symptoms associated with menopause. Continues

Review confirms link between drug use and poor dental health

A new review published online in the scientific journal Addiction has found that dental patients with substance use disorders have more tooth decay and periodontal disease than the general population, but are less likely to receive dental care. With drug use increasing by approximately three million new users each year, this is a problem that won’t disappear anytime soon. Continues

Please help Dentaid provide dental care for refugees in Greece

This is Samos refugee camp.  Around 1000 people live here after fleeing war, persecution, poverty and violence. No dental treatment has been available and people are suffering terrible toothache.  Many refugees are on liquid diets and can’t eat because their dental pain is so severe.  International dental charity Dentaid is determined to help.

Over the coming months Dentaid is sending teams of volunteer dental professionals to provide emergency dental care in the camps in Samos and neighbouring Lesvos.   

Dentaid needs your help to provide dental equipment, medicines and other materials for the clinics.

Please Donate Now

Make a difference with dentistry.

Find out more about Dentaid’s volunteering trips to Lesvos and Samos at Dentaid.org

Why Dentistry Is Separate From Medicine – and the possible consequences

Why Dentistry Is Separate From Medicine 

The divide sometimes has devastating consequences.

Doctors are doctors, and dentists are dentists, and never the twain shall meet. Whether you have health insurance is one thing, whether you have dental insurance is another. Your doctor doesn’t ask you if you’re flossing, and your dentist doesn’t ask you if you’re exercising. In America, we treat the mouth separately from the rest of the body, a bizarre situation that Mary Otto explores in her new book, Teeth: The Story of Beauty, Inequality, and the Struggle for Oral Health in America.

Specializing in one part of the body isn’t what’s weird—it would be one thing if dentists were like dermatologists or cardiologists. The weird thing is that oral care is divorced from medicine’s education system, physician networks, medical records, and payment systems, so that a dentist is not just a special kind of doctor, but another profession entirely.

But the body didn’t sign on for this arrangement, and teeth don’t know that they’re supposed to keep their problems confined to the mouth. This separation leads to real consequences: Dental insurance is often even harder to get than health insurance (which is not known for being a cakewalk), and dental problems left untreated worsen, and sometimes kill. Anchoring Otto’s book is the story of Deamonte Driver, a 12-year-old boy from Maryland who died from an untreated tooth infection that spread to his brain. His family did not have dental benefits, and he ended up being rushed to the hospital for emergency brain surgery, which wasn’t enough to save him.

A thought provoking read which continues here.

Robotics on the way…

Dr Marc Cooper a dentist turned business consultant, understands all elements of the business of dentistry. Never afraid to be provocative and often way ahead of the curve, his newsletter is amongst my top ten regular must reads.

He has written in recent times about the transformational nature of technology and the growth of robotics and AI with a newsletter, “The End of Dentists as We Know Them” where he quoted from Susskind and Susskind’s HBR paper

Our inclination is to be sympathetic to this transformative use of technology, not least because today’s professions (medicine and dentistry), as currently organized, are creaking. They are increasingly unaffordable, opaque, and inefficient, and they fail to deliver value evenly across our communities. In most advanced economies, there is concern about the spiraling costs of health care, the lack of access to justice, the inadequacy of current educational systems, and the failure of auditors to recognize and stop various financial scandals. The professions need to change. Technology may force them to.”

He has followed that up today:

….below is a copy of a Patent Application that is in process and its associated claim document.  Like everything else, from computers to man-powered flight, when an idea whose time has come arrives, numbers of people in different parts of the globe work on it simultaneously.

…..over the next decade, robotics in dentistry will play a larger and larger role, until dentists become computer operators not dental clinicians. 

It doesn’t matter if you believe me or not, the future doesn’t care about right and wrong.  The future is impartial to “what already is.”

Patent Application – http://www.sumobrain.com/patents/wipo/Medical-robotic-works-station/WO2016022347A1.pdf

Patent Claims– PDF

 one of his correspondents had sent him this: 

Robotics for implant surgery gets FDA clearance. 

http://www.neocis.com/

There’s a completely legal reason this American dentist has an office full of human heads. In case you missed. TGBSL #26

Research

TGBSL explained here

There’s a completely legal reason this American dentist has an office full of human heads

Jordan Sparks found cryonics while sifting through the Portland State University library as a student in the early 1990s. He was fascinated. He stayed fascinated through dental school, and as a practicing dentist, and while building a dental management software whose success has given him the freedom these days to pursue the dream of a deep-frozen future full time. Continues

More dental news:

1 Periodontitis may be an early sign of type 2 diabetes More.

2 Tailored preventive oral health intervention improves dental health among elderly

A tailored preventive oral health intervention significantly improved the cleanliness of teeth and dentures among elderly home care clients. In addition, functional ability and cognitive function were strongly associated with better oral hygiene, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. The study is part of a larger intervention study, NutOrMed, and the findings were published in the Age and Aging journal. More.

3 Study finds that certain type of children respond better to laughing gas

New research has determined that “focused, mindful children” respond better to nitrous oxide.  More.

4 Estrogen therapy shown effective in reducing tooth and gum diseases in postmenopausal women

Estrogen therapy has already been credited with helping women manage an array of menopause-related issues, including reducing hot flashes, improving heart health and bone density, and maintaining levels of sexual satisfaction. Now a new study suggests that the same estrogen therapy used to treat osteoporosis can actually lead to healthier teeth and gums. The study outcomes are being published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society.  More.

In case you missed TGBSL #25

Research

“TGBSL” explained here

1) Dental implant with slow-release drug reservoir reduces infection risk

Scientists have developed a dental implant containing a reservoir for the slow release of drugs. Laboratory tests in which the reservoir slowly released a strong antimicrobial agent showed that the new implant can prevent and eliminate bacterial biofilms – a major cause of infection associated with dental implants.

Continues here

2) Chewing your food could protect against infection

Researchers have found that chewing food prompts the release of an immune cell that can protect against infection.

Continues here

3) Fluoride Rinse and Varnish Equally Effective

Fluoride varnish and fluoride mouthwash appear equally effective in a head-to-head trial and in a review of the literature. The finding shows that practitioners have options in finding the best way to deliver the caries-fighting mineral to patients at high risk for the condition. Although the efficacy of fluoride is well established, much remains unknown about the relative merits of various application methods.

Continues here

In case you missed…TGBSL #23

Research

TGBSL? see more here.

1. New definition of oral health announced;

“Oral health is multifaceted and includes the ability to speak, smile, smell, taste, touch, chew, swallow, and convey a range of emotions through facial expressions with confidence and without pain, discomfort, and disease of the craniofacial complex,” reads the definition.

More here.

2. Dental implants with antibacterial activity and designed to facilitate integration into the bone.

Mouth infections are currently regarded as the main reason why dental implants fail. A piece of research by the UPV/EHU has succeeded in developing coatings capable of preventing potential bacterial infection and should it arise, eliminate it as well as providing implants with osseointegrating properties, in other words, ones that facilitate anchoring to the bone.

More here.

3. New research suggests e-cigarettes could be harmful to gums

E-CIGARETTES COULD DAMAGE gums and teeth, according to a significant recent study on the effects of vaping on oral health.

Full story here

4. Researchers add to evidence that common bacterial cause of gum disease may drive rheumatoid arthritis

Investigators at Johns Hopkins report they have new evidence that a bacterium known to cause chronic inflammatory gum infections also triggers the inflammatory “autoimmune” response characteristic of chronic, joint-destroying rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The new findings have important implications for prevention and treatment of RA, say the researchers.

Full story here