Dental Sedation Adult and Paediatric Immediate Life Support course

Lynn Fox has asked me to promote her course on Dental Sedation Adult and Paediatric Immediate Life Support. As someone who practiced sedation I believe that on going training and updates on sedation techniques and particularly Life Support are essential.

Details:

For clinical dental staff who wish to provide / assist with conscious Inhalation Sedation or both Inhalation and IV sedation for adults and children. The Dental Sedation Immediate Life Support course fully complies with IACSD standards for Conscious Sedation in the Provision of Dental Care 2015 who state “Practitioners must be able to provide age-appropriate immediate life support as defined by the main elements of the Resuscitation Council (UK) ILS and PILS training programmes. It is not essential to undertake a Resuscitation Council (UK) accredited ILS/PILS course. Alternative courses with equivalent content which are adapted to the needs of dental practice are acceptable: these might also include the management of common sedation, medical and dental emergencies.”

We are responding positively to this by offering these main Resuscitation Council elements on a non Resuscitation Council, tailor made, one day Dental Sedation Immediate Life Support course which has been developed specifically for the Dental team. This Dental Sedation Immediate Life Support course clearly combines the main elements from the RC Immediate Life Support Course (ILS) and Paediatric Immediate Life Support Course (PILS) in one day.

The course developer and lead instructor is Lynn Fox, a Resuscitation Council accredited instructor in ALS/ILS/EPLS/GIC. Lynn has 11 years of experience in teaching to hospital cardiac arrest teams and has previously lectured on anaphylaxis for the British Dental Association which is now a BDA online lecture. Lynn also teaches Dental Medical Emergencies to in-house dental practices and groups including The Oxford Post Graduate Dental School at Thames Valley Health Education.

Next open course date:

26th October 2017 in Oxfordshire.

Dental Sedation Immediate Life Support course content includes:

  • Causes and prevention of cardiorespiratory arrest in the adult and child
  • ABCDE approach including the management of dental, medical and common sedation emergencies in the adult and child including respiratory depression, aspiration, anaphylaxis and other associated emergencies
  • Basic Life Support and Automated External Defibrillation scenarios for adult and child
  • Adult and child airway management using basic maneuvers & airway adjuncts: BVM, OPA, NPA and supraglottic airway (i-gel)
  • Team roles and responsibilities
  • Assessment will focus on the compromised airway both for the respiratory and airway compromised patient and during cardiac arrest.

Certificate will show 7 hours verifiable CPD as per GDC requirements.

Link to the course website for more information and to book your place  HERE

 

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An unregulated industry that’s exploiting people, including children,

How ethical is the cosmetic surgery market?

“We’ve got largely an unregulated industry that’s exploiting people, including children, by promoting often untested and unproven products and procedures. We need better regulation of the quality and safety of these procedures, the people who carry them out, and where they are carried out.”

These were strong concluding words from the Nuffield Council of Bioethics. Its recent report, focusing on the ethical issues surrounding the cosmetic surgery industry, makes for very interesting reading. The report highlights the significant concerns, concerns that are shared by many, surrounding the UK cosmetic surgery market.

From Penningtons Manches LLP. Full article HERE.

 

In case you missed – TGBSL #31

TGBSL explained: In the second book of the semi-autobiographical series describing the progress of an Edinburgh medical graduate, Colin Douglas describes his hero, David Campbell’s, involvement with medical research. The book’s title is “The Greatest Breakthrough Since Lunchtime“ and the cynic in me always remembers it when I read headlines like these. I insist that I have a huge regard for our researchers, having watched my brother persevere with his work for years and now my son wrestle with a PhD I know that it is something to which I am not suited at all. I bow to your diligence and dedication.

1) Study: Blocking yeast-bacteria interaction may prevent severe biofilms that cause childhood tooth decay

Though most tooth decay can be blamed on bacteria, such as Streptococcus mutans, the fungus Candida albicans may be a joint culprit in an alarmingly common form of severe tooth decay affecting toddlers known as early childhood caries.

“Instead of just targeting bacteria to treat early childhood caries, we may also want to target the fungi,” said Hyun (Michel) Koo, senior author on the study and a professor in the Department of Orthodontics and Divisions of Pediatric Dentistry and Community Oral Health. “Our data provide hints that you might not need to use a broad spectrum antimicrobial and might be able to target the enzyme or cell wall of the fungi to disrupt the plaque biofilm formation.”

Full article HERE

2) Which is better Invisalign or Fixed Appliances: Part 2: Does this new systematic review help?

This is the second of two posts on the effectiveness of Invisalign and Fixed Appliances. Last week I looked at a retrospective study and this week I will look at a new systematic review.

A lot of people read this post and generated a number of comments in the blog comments section and on other forms of social media. In my post last week, I pointed out that the study was retrospective and this meant that we needed to be cautious about the conclusions because of the potential for bias. Nevertheless, I still felt that the study provided us with some useful information. Just as I finished this post, I came across this new systematic review. I would like to discuss whether this helps us further. Full article HERE

The unexpected political power of (US) dentists…

Interesting article in The Washington Post about the reaction of the dental profession to the introduction of  alternatives to provide dental care in poor and rural areas. The alternatives include such innovations as dental therapists and “open access” to hygienist care.

The bill establishing a new provider type ultimately passed, but “it was brutal, very brutal,” recalled David Burns, a Republican state senator who retired after supporting the measure. Afterward, Burns said, he got a call from his dentist, who vowed never to treat him again, saying, “This relationship is over.”…

Most of the 200,000 dentists in America work solo, in offices that are essentially small businesses. They are known for projecting a remarkably unified voice on issues relating to their livelihood. The ADA (American Dental Association) says 64 percent (my emphasis) of dentists belong to the association. By comparison, only 25 percent of physicians belong to the American Medical Association.

Full article HERE

 

In case you missed – TGBSL #30 – Life’s a beach and other research.

TGBSL explained: In the second book of the semi-autobiographical series describing the progress of an Edinburgh medical graduate, Colin Douglas describes his hero, David Campbell’s, involvement with medical research. The book’s title is “The Greatest Breakthrough Since Lunchtime“ and the cynic in me always remembers it when I read headlines like these. I insist that I have a huge regard for our researchers, having watched my brother persevere with his work for years and now my son wrestle with a PhD I know that it is something to which I am not suited at all. 

1 Ultra-tough antibiotic to fight superbugs

US scientists have re-engineered a vital antibiotic in a bid to wipe out one of the world’s most threatening superbugs.  Their new version of vancomycin is designed to be ultra-tough and appears to be a thousand times more potent than the old drug, PNAS journal reports. It fights bacteria in three different ways, making it much less likely that the bugs can dodge the attack. It is yet to be tested in animals and people, however. The Scripps Research Institute team hope the drug will be ready for use within five years if it passes more tests….

BBC Report HERE

2 Common periodontal pathogen may interfere with conception in women

According to a study carried out at the University of Helsinki, Finland, a common periodontal pathogen may delay conception in young women. This finding is novel: previous studies have shown that periodontal diseases may be a risk for general health, but no data on the influence of periodontal bacteria on conception or becoming pregnant have been available….

“Our results encourage young women of fertile age to take care of their oral health and attend periodontal evaluations regularly”, says periodontist and researcher Susanna Paju, University of Helsinki….

Medical News Today HERE

3 Study: Use of prefabricated blood vessels may revolutionize root canals

While root canals are effective in saving a tooth that has become infected or decayed, this age-old procedure may cause teeth to become brittle and susceptible to fracture over time. Now researchers at OHSU in Portland, Oregon, have developed a process by which they can engineer new blood vessels in teeth, creating better long-term outcomes for patients and clinicians….

Full story HERE

 

4 Visiting virtual beach improves patient experiences during dental procedures

Imagine walking along a South Devon beach on a lovely day. The waves are lapping on the shore, rabbits are scurrying in the undergrowth, and the bells of the local church are mingling with the calls of the seagulls. Then, as you turn to continue along the coast path feeling calm and relaxed you suddenly hear your dentist say “Fine, all done, you can take the headset off now”. For patients at one dental practice in Devon, England, such Virtual Reality encounters are resulting in demonstrably better experiences in the dentist’s chair….

Full story HERE

5  Study: Blocking yeast-bacteria interaction may prevent severe biofilms that cause childhood tooth decay

Though most tooth decay can be blamed on bacteria, such as Streptococcus mutans, the fungus Candida albicans may be a joint culprit in an alarmingly common form of severe tooth decay affecting toddlers known as early childhood caries.

In earlier research, a team from the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine had found that C. albicans, a type of yeast, took advantage of an enzyme produced by S. mutans to form a particularly intractable biofilm. In a new study, the researchers have pinpointed the surface molecules on the fungus that interact with the bacterially-derived protein. Blocking that interaction impaired the ability of yeast to form a biofilm with S. mutans on the tooth surface, pointing to a novel therapeutic strategy….

Read more HERE

 

Peter Ward exposes the NHS(E)’s “Cunning Plan”

Nice editorial in the BDJ from BDA Chief Exec Peter Ward. HERE

Edited highlights only

Death by commissioning

….That master plan looks like a determined effort to wrest away NHS dental care from small autonomous units. That model that has been supplied by a legion of conscientious practitioners ever since the beginning of the NHS. This applies both in salaried dental service and in general practice.…….

….’Savings’ is the name of the game. That coupled with ongoing ‘efficiency’ signals a race to the bottom, as each year becomes more and more squeezed than the last. It can’t be long before the social enterprises seek freedom from the obligations of NHS terms and conditions – think about the savings to be had there!…..

…..So, it is clear that the NHS in England stands to gain by ‘going large’ in all its areas of practice. But its gain is at the expense of the dentists who serve it. In essence, the wholesale dismantling of access to NHS terms and conditions provides the opportunity for savings. Proposing such a move overtly would be met with horror and outrage. Doing it stealthily and by downstream consequence may be less dramatic but the result is the same. It is not a good result for either dentists practising in England, or for patients expecting enduring, high quality care…

If only it was as easy to dismiss as Baldrick…

 

The Painful Truth About Teeth (USA)

From The Washington Post

SALISBURY, Md. — Two hours before sunrise, Dee Matello joined the line outside the Wicomico Civic Center, where hundreds of people in hoodies, heavy coats and wool blankets braced against a bitter wind. Inside, reclining dental chairs were arrayed in neat rows across the arena’s vast floor. Days later, the venue would host Disney on Ice. On this Friday morning, dentists arriving from five states were getting ready to fix the teeth of the first 1,000 people in line. Matello was No. 503. The small-business owner who supports President Trump had a cracked molar, no dental insurance and a nagging soreness that had forced her to chew on the right side of her mouth for years. “It’s always bothering me,” she said. And although her toothache wasn’t why she voted for Trump, it was a constant reminder of one reason she did: the feeling that she had been abandoned, left struggling to meet basic needs in a country full of fantastically rich people.

As the distance between rich and poor grows in the United States, few consequences are so overlooked as the humiliating divide in dental care. High-end cosmetic dentistry is soaring, and better-off Americans spend well over $1 billion each year just to make their teeth a few shades whiter. Millions of others rely on charity clinics and hospital emergency rooms to treat painful and neglected teeth. Unable to afford expensive root canals and crowns, many simply have them pulled. Nearly 1 in 5 Americans older than 65 do not have a single real tooth left. Over two days at the civic center, volunteer dentists would pull 795 teeth. A remarkable number of patients held steady jobs — a forklift operator, a librarian, a postal worker — but said they had no dental insurance and not enough cash to pay for a dentist….

….Trump’s assurance that he would build a “beautiful” health-care system to serve every American, a system that would cost less and do more. But nearly four months into Trump’s presidency, Matello sees Trump backing a Republican health care plan that appears to leave low-income people and the elderly worse off…..

….“I am hearing about a number of people who will lose their coverage under the new plan,” Matello said. “Is Trump the wolf in grandma’s clothes? My husband and I are are now saying to each other: ‘Did we really vote for him?’ ”…..“Was he just out to get our votes?”

Full article here

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