There’s a distinction between the social internet and social media.

Cal Newport‘s Latest Blogpost

On Social Media and Its Discontents

“The social internet describes the general ways in which the global communication network and open protocols known as “the internet” enable good things like connecting people, spreading information, and supporting expression and activism.

Social media, by contrast, describes the attempt to privatize these capabilities by large companies within the newly emerged algorithmic attention economy, a particularly virulent strain of the attention sector that leverages personal data and sophisticated algorithms to ruthlessly siphon users’ cognitive capital.

I support the social internet. I’m incredibly wary of social media.

Understanding the difference between these two statements is crucial if we’re going to make progress on the issues surrounding social media that have, during the last year, finally entered our mainstream cultural conversation.”

Full post here


impact is not easily measurable on short time scales

“There is currently pressure on academics to demonstrate the immediate impact of their research on society. It is perhaps worth reflecting that impact is not easily measurable on short time scales. Hawking’s was truly blue-sky research – and yet it has fascinated millions, attracting many into scientific careers. His academic legacy is not just the remarkable science he produced, but the generations of minds he shaped.”

Marika Taylor writing about Stephen Hawking in The Conversation



The Monday Morning Quote #474

“When I was 17, I read a quote that went something like, “If you live each day as if it were your last, someday you’ll most certainly be right.”

It made an impression on me… and since then, for the past 33 years I have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself, “If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I’m about to do today.”

And whenever the answer has been, “no” for too many days in a row, I know I need to change something.”

Steve Jobs

From his 2005 Stanford Commencement address which is always worth (re)watching.

Birthday words

Wise words. Not mine but those of Professor Stephen Hawking and well worth repeating.

Today is my birthday. They are all of equal importance but this one used to have far more significance. (The clue is in the second suggestion.)

“One, remember to look up at the stars and not down at your feet.

Two, never give up work. Work gives you meaning and purpose and life is empty without it. 

Three, if you are lucky enough to find love, remember it is there and don’t throw it away.”


Why I’m glad my son doesn’t play the game that I love.

As the 6 Nations reaches its climax it’s time to look hard at the real problem of head injuries.

Rugby players more likely than not to sustain a concussion after 25 matches in a season.

Concussion is one of the biggest problems facing both rugby union and league. Rates of the traumatic brain injury in rugby union have been rising since the 2012/13 season, going from one concussion every 3.2 matches, to one concussion every 1.2 matches in the 2015/16 season.

It has become such a problem that we have now found players are more likely than not to sustain a concussion after 25 matches in a single season. This rate – which came from an analysis of the 2015/16 rugby union data – was three times higher than the second most frequent injury, thigh haematoma (“dead leg”).

Full article HERE


“this torrent of idiocy and self-indulgence gets to one”

“In the end, this torrent of idiocy and self-indulgence gets to one, which is why I have morphed from being someone who always monitored Twitter into someone who only occasionally checks it.”

John Naughton in The Observer

Yes indeed.

The Monday Morning Quote #473

“We can ignore reality,

but we cannot ignore the consequences of ignoring reality.”

Ayn Rand




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