The Monday Morning Quote #449

When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle.

Edmund Burke

 

 

 

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Dental Sedation Adult and Paediatric Immediate Life Support course

Lynn Fox has asked me to promote her course on Dental Sedation Adult and Paediatric Immediate Life Support. As someone who practiced sedation I believe that on going training and updates on sedation techniques and particularly Life Support are essential.

Details:

For clinical dental staff who wish to provide / assist with conscious Inhalation Sedation or both Inhalation and IV sedation for adults and children. The Dental Sedation Immediate Life Support course fully complies with IACSD standards for Conscious Sedation in the Provision of Dental Care 2015 who state “Practitioners must be able to provide age-appropriate immediate life support as defined by the main elements of the Resuscitation Council (UK) ILS and PILS training programmes. It is not essential to undertake a Resuscitation Council (UK) accredited ILS/PILS course. Alternative courses with equivalent content which are adapted to the needs of dental practice are acceptable: these might also include the management of common sedation, medical and dental emergencies.”

We are responding positively to this by offering these main Resuscitation Council elements on a non Resuscitation Council, tailor made, one day Dental Sedation Immediate Life Support course which has been developed specifically for the Dental team. This Dental Sedation Immediate Life Support course clearly combines the main elements from the RC Immediate Life Support Course (ILS) and Paediatric Immediate Life Support Course (PILS) in one day.

The course developer and lead instructor is Lynn Fox, a Resuscitation Council accredited instructor in ALS/ILS/EPLS/GIC. Lynn has 11 years of experience in teaching to hospital cardiac arrest teams and has previously lectured on anaphylaxis for the British Dental Association which is now a BDA online lecture. Lynn also teaches Dental Medical Emergencies to in-house dental practices and groups including The Oxford Post Graduate Dental School at Thames Valley Health Education.

Next open course date:

26th October 2017 in Oxfordshire.

Dental Sedation Immediate Life Support course content includes:

  • Causes and prevention of cardiorespiratory arrest in the adult and child
  • ABCDE approach including the management of dental, medical and common sedation emergencies in the adult and child including respiratory depression, aspiration, anaphylaxis and other associated emergencies
  • Basic Life Support and Automated External Defibrillation scenarios for adult and child
  • Adult and child airway management using basic maneuvers & airway adjuncts: BVM, OPA, NPA and supraglottic airway (i-gel)
  • Team roles and responsibilities
  • Assessment will focus on the compromised airway both for the respiratory and airway compromised patient and during cardiac arrest.

Certificate will show 7 hours verifiable CPD as per GDC requirements.

Link to the course website for more information and to book your place  HERE

 

One rule for you, one rule for the rest…

Inspired by John Naughton.

Picture this – one dentist manages to lose one set of notes of one patient, who was one month old, who had made one visit to the practice as an emergency and treatment consisted of examination and parental reassurance. The notes are passed to a recognised third party for disposal but turn up on a patch of waste ground. The CQC and the GDC would be involved and that dentist would probably go through months of anxiety whilst it was decided how big the case was for them to answer.

Meanwhile…. “sometime between mid-May and July, Equifax was hacked via a security flaw in the Apache Struts software that it used to build its web applications. The flaw, which gave hackers an easy way to take control of sensitive sites, had been fixed on 6 March and patches were made available to every organisation that used Struts. That meant, as various commentators pointed out, that Equifax’s IT department had the tools to plug the security holeand two months in which to do it. For some reason, they didn’t.

As a result, the hackers were able to steal the personal information of 143 million Americans. It is the most important financial data available on any citizen – names, dates of birth, social security numbers, home addresses and in some instances a lot more, including credit card details of more than 200,000 US consumers (and some UK consumers). It’s everything you need to engage in identity theft on an epic scale. “On a scale of 1 to 10 in terms of risk to consumers,” said a fraud analyst at consultancy firm Gartner, “this is a 10.””….

…Equifax discovered the breach on 29 July, but didn’t reveal it publicly until 7 September, no doubt because the internal investigation was long and complex. During that period, however, three of its senior executives unloaded shares in the company valued at $1.8m. But this, apparently, was completely coincidental: the poor dears (who included the chief financial officer) were not aware that an intrusion had occurred when they sold their shares. 

…..if some poor unfortunate forgets to pay a library fine and then discovers that they can’t get a loan because a check on Equifax’s database reveals the payment lapse, well… that’s just tough. If you want to understand the populist revolt, then this is a good place to start.

The Monday Morning Quote #448

“Instead of thinking outside the box, get rid of the box.”

Deepak Chopra

The Weekend Read – Solitude by Michael Harris

This makes the ideal companion to “Deep Work” of which I have already written. This book which feels like a collection of essays explores the fact that our connectedness means that we have lost something that is vitally important to our lives, namely our solitude. I found it entertaining, thought provoking and important.

The author’s argument is that our increasing busyness, our being always “on” and the ever present communication devices (count how many of the next 50 people you see have got a ‘phone, smart or otherwise, in their hand) has resulted in our being unable to turn ourselves off, to experience being alone with ourselves. We all need time to think, to re-charge, to turn off without it we are losing something wonderful and valuable.

Our days are consumed by the desires that others place on us. These others are often unseen and unknown from advertisers trying to convince you that you need whatever they are selling this time through Facebook checking to see that others are having the time of their lives whilst you’re Billy no-mates to the incessant supply of emails that “demand” to be read.

We know that choice does not make us happy, that many Facebook users have or develop a need for social assurance. We are now being encouraged to make our homes connected via “The Internet of Everything”. When I ask the question “why” the only answer that I understand is, “because we can”. That’s not good enough.

When was the last time that you were truly on your own, disconnected from “the grid” as some say? Have you consciously allowed this lack of solitude to develop or has it just crept in without your specific permission, “everybody is so everybody should”.

Earlier this week I used the “Google Maps” app on my phone to guide me to someone’s house in a suburb of Manchester. I had looked at the route before I set off, it was a 25 minute walk, a pretty easy route but rather than trust my memory, my good sense of direction and my instinct I used the app. I had been there once before 4 months or so ago and didn’t want to get lost. The result – I did get lost, for some reason the app chose (can I really say it chose? Surely I was the one making the choice) to take me round three sides of a square instead of leading me to the destination directly. I knew it was wrong but allowed it to happen. Why trust something so fallible, something that has been programmed to sell me things that “it” has decided I need? I don’t know either.

A lovely book, entertaining, amusing and questioning, you’ll never see your iPhone in quite the same way again. I agree with Douglas Coupland, “I came away from this book a better human being. Michael Harris’ take on existence is calm, unique, and makes one’s soul feel good.”

You can get it from The Book Depository.

 

Sometimes you have to be grateful….

I was contacted by a prospective client yesterday who asked for testimonials from clients with whom I currently work or have worked in the past.  I want to thank the several individuals who responded to my emails within minutes with, “of course”, “pleased to help”, “send them my way” and variations on that theme.

Gratitude isn’t a good enough word.

Thanks folks, you know who you are.

I never understood modern car loans and now I know why.

In the days when I used to borrow money to buy a car I understood what I was doing. Price was £X000 borrow money at Y% over 3 years means you repay £Z every month until you can either enjoy loan free driving for a year or two or start again. Then the game changed instead of a loan you were asked to get involved in a Personal Contract Purchase (PCP) which sounded to me like renting the car.

Hearing my friend Jimmy extolling its virtues because “you can upgrade your Merc every couple of years because you just roll it on” sounded like pass the parcel but when you eventually removed the wrapping you were left with the bill for the party – or no car.

I presumed that I just didn’t understand and went back to driving my second hand, 3-series Beemers until they died beneath me. Incidentally that’s 4 cars in 31 years – total purchase cost £25K.

It seems that I was right about this PCP business and the balloon payment idea is another bubble (hardly surprising) waiting to burst.

From The Conversation:

Are we facing a car loan credit crunch? Here are the facts

 

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