The Monday Morning Quote #571

“Nothing is so useless as doing things efficiently that should never have been done at all.”

Peter Drucker

The Monday Morning Quote #570

“Quality is never an accident, it is the result of intelligent effort.”

John Ruskin

Busy being busy.

Another unfinished blog from the archive sees the light of day. This one was inspired by THIS from which I quote.

I have worked with clients, and for people, whose answer to everything is to “reorganise, start again, throw everything in the air and see where it lands”. This of course means that their lives are full of re-starts, new starts and fresh starts. It makes them feel better but often improves very little because the things that need to change are rarely addressed. They are too busy making plans, talking about the jam tomorrow will bring instead of planting the raspberry canes today, watering them tomorrow, staking them the next day, picking the fruit when it’s ripe, etc

Of course some change, the right change, is a good thing; but activity for its own sake is pointless.

They remind me of an old friend of mine who confided that his parents had been right to try to stop him when he married his pregnant girlfriend because, “it was the right thing to do”. A dozen years, four house moves, three different towns, multiple job changes, and another child later he accepted that they were incompatible and they divorced. He thought that new starts, without changing anything else, without addressing the underlying problems, would make the difference.

“Solving problems almost always starts with ensuring you’re solving the actual problem. When the actions we should take are not obvious, or the problem is difficult, it’s easy to feel the need to do something … anything. We convince ourselves that motion is better than inaction. The choice, however, isn’t between action and inaction. This is a false duality. There is a third option that often makes the most sense.”

“Motion is easy. Results are hard.”

If you’re paying a coach listen to them…

 

 

 

A reformed cynic speaks.

There is an old saying, “a cynic is what an idealist calls a realist”.

Peter Senge wrote, “Scratch the surface of most cynics and you find a frustrated idealist — someone who made the mistake of converting his ideals into expectations.”

Most of us start our businesses with high hopes and ideals of changing the world. I had dreams of ridding the world of dental diseases until someone said to me, “If you can’t get all doctors to stop smoking, what hope have you of getting everyone to floss?”

Once I had recovered from what I initially thought was an offensive comment, I soon realised that it is not only silly but a life shortening exercise, to want something for someone more than they want it themselves.

Once this simple life lesson had been inwardly digested and understood I was able to go back to being an idealist – but on my terms, nobody else’s.

 

 

The Monday Morning Quote #569

“My formula for success was very simple: Do whatever is put in front of you with all your heart and soul without regard for personal results.

Do the work as though it were given to you by the universe itself – because it was.” 

Michael Singer

(thanks Roz)

 

Who do you trust? Who can you trust? from GDPUK

My latest post for GDPUK:

One of the main tenets of Professor Onora O’Neill’s arguments around the theme of trust is that we must aim to have more trust in the trustworthy but not in the untrustworthy. She says, “I aim positively to try not to trust the untrustworthy.”

Which brings around the questions. Who can you trust? Who do you trust? And then by extension, Who can trust you? Who does trust you?

All of us exist in different circles. At the centre is the Circle of Control. Sometimes when I talk to dentists and their teams they say that they feel they have little control over their lives, I can understand those feelings but they are not correct. We have control on where our focus is from moment to moment. We choose and can control our reactions to events and to others. We control where and how we spend our time and energy. We control how we turn up every day. We also control how trustworthy we are.

The next circle is The Circle of Influence. In here are the things that concern you and that you are able to Influence. When we look at this closely many of the things that cause us concern are beyond our control and influence.

 

Finally the outer circle is the Circle of Concern. In here lie all the things that concern you in your work and life, including health, family, finances, the general economy and so on. Everything inside the circle matters to you, everything outside the circle is of no concern to you.

The lesson around the circles is to “Focus on what you can control and don’t waste energy on the things that you cannot.” To take a topical theme, it is very unlikely that any of us can control the outcome of the UK’s proposed Brexit deal – yet many are losing sleep, getting anxious, losing friends and letting it dominate their thinking.

Continues HERE.

 

 

Why wouldn’t you?

I have a hoard of unpublished blogposts, some half written, some one line ideas, they are the result of experiences, ideas, conversations, things read, seen or thought.

This one came about after talking to a client about his team routinely recording their patients’ blood pressure and pulse.

Increasingly dentists ought to be seen as Oral Physicians as well as Surgeons and should look at their patients overall health. Often dentists are in a better place to do routine checks than our medical colleagues and should do them before many procedures. This is good practice and those who embrace the role are to be encouraged. They, and their teams, do need to be competent at doing straightforward measurements. It’s something I started (but did not persevere) back in the early 1990s.

These are comments on three patients from the client

  • Nice outcome. Did patient’s BP and it was 210/99, sent her to her GMP as a matter of urgency.
  • Normally he would be hospitalised but treated under own doctor’s care, turns out to have high platelet count.
  • Had to send her away last time as we had potential cardiac issue on our hands. Saw her this time and she was still effusively grateful for us having found this. Saved her from heart attack or stroke.

The client continued:

“I cannot understand why “X” (client’s associate) is reluctant…”

“We should have been doing them years ago….”

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