Read a book! You’re too busy? All the more reason.

I know when life is getting to me, it’s when I stop reading (fiction especially) because “I don’t have time”. What I do have is time that I waste on apparently being busy, doing things that could be started, completed and given me time to read. That’s why this article resonated with me. 

It’s that moment when you sink into the seat on the train home from a stressful day at work, relieved to lose yourself in a Kate Atkinson bestsellerfor 20 minutes. It’s easing yourself under your duvet at bedtime, prising open Sarah Waters’ Fingersmith, desperate to discover Sue Trinder’s fate. It’s those two minutes snatched with Jane Eyre while you’re waiting for the kettle to boil. 

Reading a book is one of life’s biggest joys, but could it also be a way of coping with the difficult times in life, from bereavement to relationship problems? 

New research suggests that reading could be hugely beneficial for our mental health, with classic books written by authors such as William Shakespeare and Charles Dickens being proven to help relieve depression and chronic pain. In a new study published by Oxford University Press, “challenging language” was found to send “rocket boosters” to our mind that can help boost our mental health….

Full article here

COVID-19: too little, too late?

I had to post a couple of pieces on Covid-19, not my words but those who are far more eloquent than me. I doubt anyone will read these but it made me feel better to share them.

Worth reading and considering. I have received half a dozen emails today trying to sell me “stuff”, from courses to scanners, using the epidemic/pandemic as an excuse – most of them are only fit for the Desperate Marketing column of Private Eye.

I wanted to read something better.

“So governments have to choose between public health and the economy.

This is, ultimately, the message of this Editorial in The Lancet:”

…..So far, evidence suggests that the colossal public health efforts of the Chinese Government have saved thousands of lives. High-income countries, now facing their own outbreaks, must take reasoned risks and act more decisively. They must abandon their fears of the negative short-term public and economic consequences that may follow from restricting public freedoms as part of more assertive infection control measures.

From the same source John Naughton :

Bill Gates on the coming pandemic

 

The Monday Morning #596

Effectiveness without values is a tool without a purpose.”

Edward de Bono

The Monday Morning Quote #595

“Learn the tools.

Seize the moment.”

Henri Cartier-Bresson

 

 

icartie001p1

Time to give up the hand shake and replace it with…

In these times of contagion fear perhaps we should reconsider our traditional meeting gesture. Research shows that the strong handshake is responsible for sharing twice as many “bugs” as the moderate handshake or high five.

The lowest risk contact is the brief fist bump. It might take a little bit of patient education but it’s the way to go.

The men from Aberystwyth did the research a few years ago.

If it’s good enough for the Obamas…

 

 

Dan Tuohy on his disillusionment

“Integrity and loyalty is a thing of the past, even a simple gesture of looking someone in the eye has gone.”

“As a professional you get paid well, the lifestyle is class, all the [nonsense] aside it really is a dream job, although I had grown sick and tired of the pre-season goalsetting of honesty and respect being brandished around only to be broken almost straight away by the same people preaching it” he said.

Dan Tuohy speaking about his retirement (from professional rugby). I wonder how many other people of his age feel the same as he does about their chosen careers?

Full article on BBC website.

The Monday Morning Quote #594

“If you really put a small value upon yourself,

rest assured that the world will not raise your price.”

Jean Sibelius (via Roz)

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