Little by little – Happy Winter Solstice.

Happy Winter Solstice! Don’t worry I’m not going off on a Pagan kick just taking sometime to enjoy the bleak midwinter.

Today, December 21st, is the shortest day of the year. Where I live the daylight will last for 7 hours 49 minutes and 18 seconds. As I used to tell my son, before he could scientifically argue back, today is the day when the sun packs its suitcase and starts heading northwards and Summer is on the way.

Tomorrow there will be 7hr 49min 19s of daylight, the day after another 7 seconds and on January 1st we can enjoy all of 7hr 55min 21sec presuming we’re awake by 8.02am , by the time we reach the Summer Solstice there will be 16hr 38min 48sec.

It reminds me of the one sure way to achieving and continuing success, small constant increments. Many of us start by presuming we will experience the “big bang” at some point and finally reach success will be ours. The truth is far more ordinary, small incremental changes for the better is the way to attain success. Read about Dave Brailsford’s work in cycling, look at the vast majority of successful enterprises and you will see that little happens overnight rather it is the gradual progression that gets results.

Progress does occur, there will be setbacks of course but by focussing on making every day better than the one before then you will move forward into your particular sunshine. One where we are not obliged to head backwards after June 21st.

Take some time over the holiday period to ask yourself what you want your changes to be this year. What’s your 2020-Vision? What are the steps you must start making?

 

It’s always the small that get squeezed the most…

Over the past few years I have seen a few dentists who are being forced into financial situations that are making survival harder with relatively short-term loans that were taken out at “tight” times and their banks declining to support them further by rescheduling the debts over a longer term. Instead of being able to breathe and grow their businesses they are constantly having act in the short term, thus significantly increasing the stress in their lives. Mike Cherry’s words struck a chord, as it isn’t only Dentists who have these problems.

“Despite being a decade on from the crash, we still have this dangerous combination of weak appetite for, and low awareness of, alternative finance options, high borrowing costs and inadequate support for small firms that are turned down by banks.”

Mike Cherry, National Chairman of the Federation of Small Businesses, commenting on research which suggests that UK economic growth is being ‘restricted’ by limited access to alternative finance options for small firms.

via PG&T

As one of the founders of PG&T, that wonderful true gentleman, Ted Price (may he rest in peace) said when he dressed down the Area Director of my bankers in 1992 after they threatened to bankrupt me when my debts ran as high as £42K (less than the cheapest one bedroom flat on the local housing development), “you lot (ie Bankers) can’t lend money to the likes of Robert Maxwell and expect this young man (sic) to bale you out!”

The Monday Morning Quote #508

“We are all manufacturers.

Making good, making trouble or making excuses.”

H.V. Adolt

Thanks to John Niland

 

The Incisal Edge Podcast – Public Relations for Dentists with Chris Baker

In their second conversation in the pod, Alun and Chris Baker from Corona Design & Communications talk about the best way to use local Public Relations to promote your Dental Practice.

 

CIPD’s Top 6 reasons to go to court

The biggest challenge in Dental Practices through the Spring and Summer of 2017 seemed to be people. I’m not sure if we have greater expectations of our teams and/or our leaders or whether the general feeling of uncertainty (Brexit etc) is manifesting itself in the way we behave towards each other. All I know is I have fielded more questions from clients (& non-clients) about team behaviour than ever before.

CIPD listed their Top 6 Reason employers end up in court and how to avoid it. Full article HERE

1)Discrimination

Why a tricky area of the law is only going to get trickier – and how HR can stay ahead

Among the biggest casualties of the introduction of tribunal fees in 2013 were claims for discrimination – there was a 91 per cent drop in the number of sex discrimination cases in the first year.

The Supreme Court’s decision that fees are unlawful (see page 8) will undoubtedly mean case numbers will rise….

2) TUPE

Service provision changes aren’t exciting, but they could prove costly

It’s the four-letter word every HR professional dreads: TUPE, or the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations, has always been fraught with the potential to confuse because it is highly technical and heavy on detail.

Recent cases have focused on one key aspect of the regulations – whether there has been a service provision change during a transfer, which can then determine which employees retain their current terms and conditions (or not) under TUPE at their new employer….

3) Flexible working

Justifications matter when it comes to granting or denying requests

According to Deloitte’s Millennial Survey 2017, flexible ways of working – whether that’s location, hours or contractual arrangements – are highly valued by workers born between the early 1980s and early 2000s. Those in organisations with a high degree of flexibility are more likely to be loyal to their employer and to say this has a positive impact on their wellbeing and that of the business…

4) Religion

From dress codes to the intricacies of helping people from different faiths work together

When it comes to religion at work, one of the ways it is most visibly expressed is in the way employees dress. Two European cases have provided food for thought on whether employers can be proscriptive with dress codes in relation to religion….

5) Parental leave

Problems over parity between mums and dads could be storing up trouble

With discrimination against women during pregnancy or maternity leave costing businesses close to £280m a year, according to the Equality and Human Rights Commission, parenthood at work is potentially expensive. And discrimination is a particular consideration when it comes to shared parental leave (SPL).

6) Disciplinaries and grievances

Follow the rule book and keep a written record – or be prepared to write a large cheque 

HR isn’t all about the process. But when a disciplinary or grievance makes the news, you can be pretty certain someone, somewhere didn’t follow the rules. Both are situations that organisations strive to resolve informally and internally to avoid a costly tribunal. “Most employees are quite reluctant to raise a formal grievance because they think they will be earmarked as a troublemaker, and employers wish to avoid the fallout,”

Nice piece on the practical elements of leadership from the HBR

Use High Standards to Motivate Employees

Employees constantly watch their leaders to understand what kind of people they are. So one of the most important things leaders can do is to insist on high standards. While low standards lead to low commitment, high standards are energising, even for the most self-motivated employees. But choose your arenas carefully. If you demand perfection in every aspect of performance, you’ll come across as a tyrannical nitpicker. Choose one or two things you want to be known for, such as always being prepared for meetings, insisting on product quality, or supporting excellent customer service. Whatever the standard is, consistently uphold it and demand it of others.

Adapted from “Followers Don’t See Their Leaders as Real People,” by Nathan T. Washburn and Benjamin Galvin

A Formula To Measure Likely Success

 

On a small scrap of paper is the wisdom that Peggy Collins from my Toastmasters Group shared with us last week.

Mark yourself out of Ten for the Desire to achieve a goal and the Action you will take to reach it.

Multiply to see the percentage chance of attaining it.

No amount of Desire without Action and no amount of Action without Desire will lead to success.

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