Think Pink! really?

Dentist surgeries should think pink if they want to relax patients, according to Lima Europe

According to interior designers, Lima Europe, businesses should think about how their customers want to feel when refurbishing their premises. A mid to light pink, which can help to relax the muscles, would be an ideal colour for a dentists

Feelings experienced when entering a new environment can be in part attributed to colour, therefore, according to commercial interior designers, Lima Europe, businesses should think about how their customers want to feel when refurbishing their premises. For example, patients visiting the dentist are often nervous so a mid to light pink, which can help to relax the muscles, would be an ideal colour to choose.

Colour is light that travels in waves from the sun and the energy from light is absorbed through the eyes; it stimulates the pituitary and pineal glands, which in turn control some of the body’s systems, including hormonal changes. Research suggests that pink is a calming colour and so is regularly used in rooms where a tranquilising effect is desired, for example, in hospitals, rehabilitation centres and even prisons.

Dentist practices, however, should avoid cerise and hot pinks as these could add to an increased heart rate acceleration, respiration and brain wave activity. Bright colours such as these tones of pink and the pure red are extremely stimulating and powerful; red grabs our attention and appears nearer than it actually is due to it being the longest wavelength.

When working closely with their clients, London interior designers, Zoltán Madosfalvi and Alíz Ördög from Lima Europe, carefully discuss colour palettes and the feeling required for the particular space. Zoltán explains: “Some of Lima’s business clients, such as dentist, doctors’ and cosmetic surgeries, come to me wanting their reception area to reflect their brand identity whilst also creating a feeling of cleanliness. However, it is extremely important to produce the correct atmosphere for the customer or client, which includes considering the psychology of colour; a consumer is not likely to return on the basis of liking a brand’s colour palette but may do so if they felt relaxed and safe in the environment. When a soothing affect is needed, a pink in a muted tone can be very successful as can a restful green.”

From Journalism.co.uk

I can imagine a lot of dentists who still adopt the patrician “doctor knows best” approach having Basil’s take on this, but I feel that we need to listen to all opinions on how our work places can be optimised.

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