40 years on M.K. still asks hard questions.

Forty years ago I was four and a half months in to my first job as one of the two “Resident House Surgeons in the Dept of Oral Surgery” at The London Hospital, now The Royal London. I am still amazed that I got the post, the story of my interview is worth hearing if only for the informal way the “second half” of the interview was conducted.

I was on the lowest rung of an impressive ladder at the London, with an SHO, three registrars, two senior registrars, a senior lecturer, two consultants, a Reader and the great Professor Gordon Seward at the top of the ladder.

It was the most intense period of my career, rivalling the first 18 months of practice ownership. At the London I was learning clinically whilst as the owner of two squats I was painfully cutting my teeth on business. I was privileged to see a huge variety of work, to straddle the divide between in and out patient care and to be on the “staff” of a major dental school and hospital.

One of the individuals from the Dental Hospital I encountered in the tea room was a young Irish registrar from Athenry with a great sense of humour who questioned everything and went on to great success.

It is no surprise then, that Martin Kelleher (for it was he), is now questioning the current explosion of tooth moving encouraged by American Corporations with an eye on the bottom  line. In this blog post from Kevin O’Brien (adapted from an article in Dental Update) he eloquently seeks answers to questions that seem to have been overlooked amidst the sales and marketing hysteria.

Worth a read and a touch of reflection.

“The race to the bottom for the quickest, allegedly ‘great’ or bargain deal in orthodontics has reached a place that few would have thought possible even five years ago. This gradual ‘uberization’ of orthodontics
 has produced a raft of new and largely unproven claims for treatments. These are promoted with gushing enthusiasm and superficial short-term evidence of their supposed long-term benefits for patients.”

Continues here.

 

 

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